Arts & Culture

In 1950, Gwendolyn Brooks became the first African-American to be awarded a Pulitzer Prize. Hers was a Pulitzer in poetry, specifically for a volume titled Annie Allen that chronicled the life of an ordinary black girl growing up in the Bronzeville neighborhood on Chicago's famous South Side.

Brooks was in her living room when she learned she had won, she recalled in a Library of Congress interview, and it was growing dark. She didn't turn on the lights, because she knew what would happen. Money was tight, and the bill hadn't been paid.

Best of Show
Terry Way

VizCity talks with juror Ruth Armatage  about the Emerald Art Center National Juried Show in Springfield.

 

The Emerald Spring Exhibition is a national juried show at Springfield’s Emerald Art Center. I caught up with Ruth Armitage, who juried the show. Ruth commented, "I was just looking through the show and going, 'How am I ever going to decide on the Best of Show?'

Tiffany Eckert

Forty years ago, John Hockenberry got his start in radio in Eugene as a volunteer at KLCC. Next, he joined national public radio, then worked in network television. Hockenberry returned to radio journalism as host of the Takeaway which airs on KLCC at 11am. He was in Eugene for the Presidential Lecture Series at Lane Community College.

Photo by Danielle Knapp

The Space Between Us: Immigrants, Refugees and Oregon, is the next topic in the Oregon Humanities Conversation Project.

On the Ragged Edge of Medicine: Doctoring among the Dispossessed, is a book by Dr. Patricia Kullberg, reflecting on her experience in medical practice for the homeless and urban poor in Portland.  She’ll read at the UO bookstore on Wednesday evening, May 24th with book sales to benefit White Bird Clinic. She speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan about the health costs of poverty, and the need for empathy as well as universal care. 

Ten years ago, Mason Williams was the featured performer for the first event at the Wildish Theater in Springfield. Now he returns as a guest at the theater’s 10th anniversary gala on Saturday, May 20th. He speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan about his career, including the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, his instrumental hit “Classical Gas,” his art projects and a new movie he’s in with Tom Hanks and others. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

Everyone’s days are numbered, and baby boomers of the “flower child” era are no exception.  A Eugene funeral company has tapped into that vibe, with a new storage facility at its west Eugene site. As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, it’s for the remains of dearly-departed Deadheads, hippies…or anyone who wants to go out with a distinctive 60s groove.  

The film Tracktown, made by University of Oregon alum and Olympic runner Alexi Pappas and her partner Jeremy Teicher, is showing now in Eugene. It features familiar Eugene haunts, including Hayward Field, Saturday Market, and running trails around town.

He passed early Sunday morning of pneumonia. Michael was 66.

Socio-Political comedian W. Kamau Bell is the host of the show United Shades of America on CNN, the author of the new book The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell, the host of three podcasts, and star of the stand-up special and comedy album Semi-Prominent Negro. He’ll bring his stand-up comedy show to the Hult Center in Eugene on Friday, May 19th; he speaks with KLCC's Eric Alan from the CNN studios. 

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