Arts & Culture

Photo by Jenny Graham

If you wake up each morning worried about the world, relief is available at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. “Shakespeare in Love,” a stage adaptation of the award-winning 1998 film, will dazzle you with raucous wit, inspired bedlam, pleasing music and sumptuous costumes.

In conjunction with the exhibition Hungry Planet: What the World Eats, the UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History presents “Bowls Around Town: Eugene, OR” in which people can check out a handmade ceramic bowl from artist Michael J. Strand, along with a digital camera. 

Tiffany Eckert

There’s a new non-profit in town-- but by design-- it won’t stick around.  Volunteers on Wheels is made up of people who travel from place to place in two brightly painted school buses. They find volunteer projects in every town they visit. As KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert reports, this mobile non-profit has already logged 2,000 collective hours helping out in and around Eugene.

“Art Song” is a classical chamber music form setting poetry to music. Soprano Laura Wayte is founder of the art song performance series “Songs@Tsunami.” She speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan, before a March 25th show focusing on music for, by and about women. It will feature vocalist Janene Nelson and pianist Yuliya Minina. 

Beverly Soasey, head shot
Sandy Brown Jensen

Show: Viz City

Title: “Wired Differently”

Subject: Bev Soasey, Multi-Media Artist

Date of Interview: Sunday, March 12, 2017

Date of Broadcast: 3/ 22/17

Script: Sandy Brown Jensen

Sound Engineer: Terry Way

NARRATOR: Have you ever met somebody who is just wired differently? This afternoon Viz City talks to Eugene multi-media artist Bev Soasey. She has a piece currently at the Maude Kerns Art Center called “Wired Differently,” so we asked Bev about the name.

The last time I talked with Paul Watson, I reached him aboard a Canadian Coast Guard Icebreaker in the Arctic, via satellite phone.

"The captain was glaring at me because we talked for a long time," Watson remembers with a laugh.

That was three years ago, and Watson, a columnist for The Toronto Star, was alongside archaeologists who had just located one of two sunken ships lost in the Franklin Expedition, back in the 1840s.

Photo by Jenny Graham

In “Mojada, A Medea in Los Angeles,” playwright Luis Alfaro manages an impressive feat, melding a Greek tragedy with a heartbreaking story of Mexican immigrants.

Now playing at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, with sensitive direction by Juliette Carrillo, this play follows the life of Medea, a young indigenous woman from Michoacán now residing in Los Angeles with her beloved Jason, pronounced Ha-sohn, their son Acan, and Tita, an old family friend. All are mojados, wetbacks, illegal.

Bestselling author Laurie Notaro’s new book is Crossing the Horizon. The historical novel focuses on the lives of three early women pilots--Elsie McKay, Ruth Elder and Mabel Boll--each striving to be the first woman to complete a flight across the Atlantic Ocean.

Springfield Museum

Next in our road trip series, KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert introduces us to some of the notable people who hail from Springfield. (Listen to interviews and watch the slideshow!)

Rachael McDonald

Over the past several years, Springfield has worked to improve its image. Once known for empty storefronts, seedy bars and crime, the city has used art in its efforts to revitalize downtown.  This took a lot of help from the community.

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