Arts & Culture

This is KLCC.  I’m Connie Bennett, Director of Eugene Public Library, with a book review of Phil Knight’s "Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the creator of Nike.”

Photo by Eric Alan

Ladysmith Black Mambazo has brought their joyful vocal music from South Africa to the world for over half a century, their music rising from isicathamiya, the music of the mines. That tradition is respected and extended on the new Ladysmith Black Mambazo CD, Walking in the Footsteps of Our Fathers. 

White Bird Clinic

Friends, family and countless members of Eugene's homeless community have lost a tireless advocate. Robert "Bob" Dritz, one of the earliest administrators of White Bird Clinic, died peacefully in hospice on January 15th.  For this tribute, KLCC's Tiffany Eckert sat down with two of his colleagues at White Bird to talk about the man and his legacy.


Mary Tyler Moore played the girl who could turn the world on with her smile. The actress is beloved for two TV roles: the single young professional Mary Richards on The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and before that, the earnest homemaker Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show.

Moore died Wednesday at the age of 80, her longtime representative told NPR.

Photo by Lindsey McCarthy

  The Eugene Symphony welcomes the second of its three finalists to become the symphony’s next conductor and music director. Ryan McAdams will conduct the Eugene Symphony on Thursday, January 26th at the Hult Center.

Eugene Opera

The Eugene Opera has cancelled its performances for the rest of the season. The opera cites disappointing ticket sales and a $165-thousand shortfall.

  Herb Alpert’s extraordinary, eclectic career has spanned over fifty years in the music business so far.

Radiolab has become one of this era’s most inventive radio programs and podcasts, bringing a sense of discovery and curiosity to big ideas from science to philosophy. Co-host Robert Krulwich speaks with Eric Alan about orchestrating the news, snail sex, and what it means to keep your stupid on.

Islam and American culture are explored in Sandow Birk’s exhibition, American Qur’an, on display at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art on the UO campus, January 21st through March 19th. The exhibition integrates ink and gouache paintings, calligraphy and the verses of the Qur’an, with scenes of American life to explore and express our shared humanity. Sandow Birk speaks with Eric Alan.

  

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