Arts & Culture

The Eugene Public Library has been ranked in the top 3% in the United States for cost-effective service.

Library Journal conducts the ranking. It looks at four factors, including circulation, visits and program attendance. Connie Bennett is Eugene Library's Director. She explains the fourth factor.

LCC’s Blue Door Theatre presents In the Next Room, or The Vibrator Play, Sarah Ruhl's Tony-nominated play based on the Victorian-era use of vibrators to treat “hysterical” women. Director Willow Norton returns from New York City to the Willamette Valley, to talk with Eric Alan about medicine, intimacy and electricity, and why it’s all relevant for modern relationships. 

The Eugene Symphony presents its second Counterpoint Festival, partnering with a variety of community and arts organizations to explore the themes of “Love and Fate,” in events across the spectrum of the creative arts. That includes two performances by the Eugene Symphony: Symphonie Fantastique on November 14th, then Romeo & Juliet and Porgy & Bess on November 23rd, including collaboration with the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Eric Alan speaks with the symphony’s executive director Scott Freck, and music director and conductor Danail Rachev. 

Cheryl Crumbley

NPR's Michele Norris and NPR Senior Producer Walter Ray Watson joined KLCC's Rachael McDonald to talk about The Race Card Project. They're in Eugene to speak with students at the University of Oregon.

Michele Norris will be on OPB's Think Out Loud Wednesday at noon. KLCC will simulcast the show. Norris speaks 7 p.m. at the UO EMU Ballroom.

Julie Sabatier

The heart of every conflict is a strong will. Artists have definite opinions about their work. It’s the passion they feel that fuels their creativity. But it can also lead to conflict when they combine their talents. That’s what one married couple found when they decided to work together to create a unique sculpture. Our story comes from Julie Sabatier of the public radio show, Destination DIY.

Tom Rawson

Nov 9, 2013

Folksinger and storyteller has also been a teacher for 20 years ("Real musicians have day jobs," he says.) We talk about the benefits of music on learning, and he cues us in on the latest tool of the folk process: YouTube.

Rawson performs with a capella group In Acchord Saturday, Nov. 9, 7 pm at the Eugene Friends Meeting House, 2274 Onyx St., Eugene.

As part of the Eugene International Film Festival, Anthony Powell's award-winning documentary Antarctica: A Year on Ice screens at the Bijou Metro on Friday evening, November 8th. In this interview, Eric Alan speaks with Ben Bonnet, who appears briefly in the film, and has worked at Antarctica's McMurdo Station for several years. He talks about the strong community found there, the unexpected effects of constant winter darkness on sleep, and why polar residents dream of guacamole.

Guitarist Mark Elf has carved a distinguished career in the jazz world, with a career spanning over forty years. During that time, he's had nine consecutive albums reach number one on the national radio jazz charts, and performed or recorded with greats Dizzy Gillespie, Wynton Marsalis, Jimmy Heath and many others.

A Distinguished Line

Oregon Contemporary Theatre (formerly Lord Leebrick Theatre) presents Who Am I This Time? (And Other Conundrums of Love) from November 8th through 30th. The play is adapted from the early comic stories of Kurt Vonnegut by playwright Aaron Posner, who has gone on to national success after growing up in Eugene. Lead actors Bill Hulings and Storm Kennedy talk with Eric Alan about the play's parallels to Thornton Wilder's Our Town, about the similarities between the play's small-town Connecticut setting and Oregon, and what the play reveals about love and fate.