Economy

Economy, Business, Finance & Labor

Hunger's Challenges Multiply In Remote Parts Of Oregon

Jan 13, 2015
Amanda Peacher / OPB

People who live in cities usually have a grocery store or a food pantry option within a few miles. But in rural communities, access to groceries with affordable fresh food is harder to come by.

Amanda Peacher / OPB

Nearly 15 years ago, Oregon had the highest rate of hunger in the nation. The state changed a number of policies to try to help. But the percentage of people facing hunger today is nearly as high as it was in 2000. In this series, we talk to Oregonians who struggle to put food on the table, and look at programs that provide support. Amanda Peacher reports on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

thenewsguard.com

Some scientists say the Pacific Northwest is overdue for a massive earthquake. In the past couple weeks, Business Oregon awarded grants to schools and emergency services for seismic upgrades. But, the Governor and others want to substantially increase that investment.

LERC

Despite Oregon having the 2nd highest minimum wage in the nation, low-wage workers in the state are finding it increasingly difficult to make ends meet. That's the finding of a new report from the University of Oregon.

Lane County used to be the center of motor home manufacturing in Oregon, employing about 4,500 people. Then the recession hit. Only one of the RV makers survived. Marathon Coach announced Tuesday it plans to increase production and hire more workers.

Voices From Cannabis Country: Part 2

Dec 30, 2014
John Rosman / OPB

Last month, Oregonians voted to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. Today, we bring you two more voices from residents of southwest Oregon talking about cannabis in their community.

First, we’ll hear from Jennifer Phillippi. She’s the owner of the last remaining sawmill in Josephine County.

Next is Richard Davis, known locally as Pa Butt. He’s a longtime medical marijuana grower. Davis spoke to us at his grow operation, where a deer he’s named Sugar Bob often joins him as he works.

Voices From Cannabis Country: Part 1

Dec 30, 2014
Wikimedia Commons

Last month, Oregonians voted to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. Today and tomorrow, we bring you voices from southern Oregon, where pot is already an important part of the culture and economy.
Chelsea Rose is an archeologist in Jacksonville. Rose is fascinated by the oral history of pot and the grow sites she finds by accident. OPB joined her and local cat on a hike to an old grow site in the Applegate valley.

Oregon Department of Justice

Oregon's Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum has made a list of naughty and nice charities. During the last few days of giving for 2014, it's important to research non-profits, and know how their funds are spent.

Ellen Klem is with the Oregon Department of Justice. She says it's encouraging that no Oregon-based groups made the list of 20 worst charities this year:

Klem: "I think one of the tips we've been encouraging Oregonians to keep in mind this holiday season is to donate locally. It's a wonderful feeling to see your donation in action here in the state."

Photo of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge by Gary Halvorson, Oregon State Archives, on Wikimedia Commons.

Members of a new national coalition say there's a link between start-up companies and the outdoors. And they are encouraging the federal government to expand national parks and monuments to accommodate the trend in the rising workforce. Conservation for Economic Growth Coalition includes a dozen CEO's of venture capital firms, and they say today's labor force wants an active, healthy lifestyle to accompany their work habits. Nancy Pfund is a Spokeswoman for DBL Investors.

theeconomiccollapseblog.com

The  unemployment rate in Lane County, as in the whole state of Oregon, has flattened out. 

Lane County's unemployment rate, established through a household survey, stood at 6.9 percent in November.  That's according to Brian Rooney, regional economist for the Oregon Employment Department. It's down only slightly from a 7.1 percent rate a year ago.

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