Education

This page contains KLCC stories about Education. 
Also visit KLCC's 12-part series on The Future of Public Education in Oregon

Lane Community College

Lane Community College is facing an expected budget deficit of $10 million to $12 million next year if student enrollment continues to decline. KLCC's Rachael McDonald spoke with LCC President Mary Spilde to get a fuller picture.

The LCC Board of Education meets Monday April 28th at 5 p.m. to decide on proposed program cuts.

Oregon Coast STEM

The Oregon Department of Education wants to promote science, technology, engineering, and math, or "STEM" subjects. It has awarded $2.8 million to six 'learning hubs' around the state.

The Oregon Coast STEM Hub received the largest of the grants. Terry Crews is the project manager. She says Newport schools have had a partnership with marine science centers for about six years…

Crews: "With the intent of making Lincoln County School District students the most ocean-literate in the state, if not the country."

Lane Community College

Lane Community College may have to lay off part time and even full time employees if its enrollment continues to decline.

The college experienced a surge in enrollment during the recession, but that's dropped off as the economy has improved.
Lane saw a 40 percent boost in enrollment from 2008 to 2012 as people who had lost their jobs went to school for technical training. LCC president Mary Spilde says as state funding for higher education has dwindled; the college is more dependent on tuition.

Bree Bouse

Edgewood Elementary School in South Eugene is the new state champion for the Oregon Battle of the Books, or OBOB. The team includes two sisters, and their mom is one of the coaches. This is only the third year the reading club has been at Edgewood and the first time they’ve been to state finals.

Meeting Date: Friday April 11, 2014

Air Date: Monday April 14, 2014

Diversity is central to the academic mission of the university. The meaning of diversity and how to makes it meaningful in the lives of UO students, faculty, and staff are the focus of the presentation by Alex-Assensoh. The UO has long been known as a place where talent is identified and nurtured. Programs and policies instituted by the Equity and Inclusion office are designed to create a more welcoming environment for all members of the community.

Samantha Stendal

Two University of Oregon students have been awarded a Peabody for their 25 second video that addresses sexual assault. It’s the first time a viral video has been given the prize which recognizes storytelling in media.

U of O student Samantha Stendal made the video with her friend Aaron Blanton. Stendal says the idea came during media coverage of the Steubenville rape trial last year. She felt the victim was being blamed because she had been drinking.

www.mckenzie.k12.or.us

Dr. Sally J. Storm is superintendent of the 230-student McKenzie School District 40 miles east of Eugene/Springfield.  On March 31st, she was appointed superintendent of the 1,500-student Fern Ridge School District, serving  Elmira, Veneta, Noti and Walton.  Dr.  Storm will succeed  current superintendent Dennis Friedrich.  She speaks with KLCC's Claude Offenbacher

North Eugene High School

A North Eugene High School Custodian was surprised to find out she was nominated for a national award recognizing outstanding work with students.

The Value Of A Liberal Arts Education

Mar 24, 2014

Meeting Date: Friday, March 21, 2014

Air Date: Monday, March 24, 2014

Eugene 4J

Residents of the Eugene 4J School District will decide this November whether to continue tax support for local schools.  Wednesday night, the School Board voted to put a local option levy on the ballot that would fund the district to the tune of $8 million per year.

    

Board member Jim Torrey said the district was already stretched, and losing the funds would have major consequences.

Eugene 4J Schools

In a recent research study, Oregon was reported to have the third largest public school classes in the country.  KLCC's Claude Offenbacher speaks with Eugene 4J’s Roosevelt Middle School principal Chris Mitchell and two of his students to discuss the impact of larger classes on their school.

Elementary Students Show Off Culinary Skills

Mar 15, 2014
Desmond O'Boyle

How young do you start teaching children how to cook? The Eugene 4J School District thinks 4th and 5th grades are a good time to start.

Elementary Students faced off in a culinary competition Saturday at Sheldon High School. Future Master Chef Oria Winkler was working on a sandwich called "Sweet Monkey Spice."

Winkler: "It has honey, peanut butter, bananas, and cinnamon."

Reporter: "What is your favorite part about doing this today?"

Winkler: "Just like seeing how many people are doing all the sandwiches', and trying new things. And it just seems really fun."

Eugene Weekly.

The Eugene YMCA is hoping to build a new facility. The Eugene 4J School District needs to build a new middle school. The two entities are working together to find a solution.

Jessica Robinson

Northwest parents of school-aged children have a new acronym to learn: The SBAC. That's the new standardized test that's set to replace current state math and language arts tests in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. It's billed as the “next generation” of assessment – a test that hopes to capture students' abilities with more depth than traditional standardized tests. But, some critics say the new test runs into the same old problems.

How Are Young Ducks Growing Their Own Businesses

Feb 24, 2014

Recorded on: Friday February 21, 2014

Air Date: Monday February 24, 2014

While sharing a basket of tater tots, four students in the University of Oregon’s “New Venture Planning” class decided on a ketchup project (surely they could come up with something tastier). Red Duck Foods, Inc. is the result. That’s only one of the student projects that has turned into a business in recent years. Among businesses that the UO has helped to launch, some were started by undergraduates still in school.

Jes Burns

Eugene’s Depression-era stadium has a new chance for life.  Wednesday night, the Eugene 4J School Board voted to accept the City of Eugene’s bid for Civic Stadium.  The City offered $4.5 million for the Civic Stadium properties in South Eugene, but is requiring the community to raise significant additional funds to renovate the neglected all-wood grandstand and manage the facility.  4J Board Member Jim Torrey put it bluntly.

Program Director Don Hein explains the KLCC studio to students from Chiloquin High School on Feb 19. Chiloquin is a small town located north of Klamath Falls, and their high school has been granted a Low Power FM construction permit by the FCC. They came to Eugene to see an actual radio station in operation. Best of luck with your new station, Chiloquin High!!

"Bottom of 16th": Civic Stadium Vote Expected

Feb 19, 2014
Jes Burns

Wednesday night the Eugene 4j School Board will decide if they will accept the City of Eugene’s offer to purchase historic Civic Stadium. 

The district received three bids for the properties in South Eugene – one each from Fred Meyer, the YMCA, and the City of Eugene.  Superintendent Sheldon Berman has recommended the district accept the City’s offer. At a 4J School Board Meeting in early February, board members seemed tired of the issue, which they have been dealing with for the past decade.  

Board Chair Mary Walston:

Eugene School District 4J

The Eugene 4J School Board is expected to vote Wednesday to exclude media from its executive sessions on labor negotiations. 

Past practice has permitted media members to attend meetings at which the 4J board planned its negotiations positions and strategy.

The decision to meet privately in the future was initially made in closed session.  The Register-Guard, citing the State's public meetings law, informed 4J their decision must be arrived at openly.  The District will now therefore review the matter at its regular meeting.

Jes Burns

Wednesday night the Eugene 4j School Board will make a decision about what to do with historic Civic Stadium.  The district received three bids for the properties in South Eugene – from Fred Meyer, the YMCA, and the City of Eugene.  The Superintendent has recommended the district accept the City’s offer.

On KLCC, we’ve heard from all three bidders and the 4j Superintendent.  Now, we’ll hear from the people charged with making the decision.  School Board members spoke about their positions at a meeting in early February.

We’ll start with Board Member Anne Marie Levis.

Former Bear Creek Elementary Principal Matt Montoya is suing the Bend-La Pine School District.

Karen Richards

The graduate teaching fellows union at the University of Oregon is bargaining for a new contract. They want a higher minimum salary and expanded health care coverage.

A group of over 100 graduate student teachers and their supporters gathered in front of Johnson Hall Friday. They spoke about the need to raise compensation packages in order to attract high-quality graduate students.

David Craig is a PHD student in philosophy.

spray graffiti
R.A.C. Giddens

A bomb threat prompted evacuation of Fern Ridge Middle School this (Wednesday) morning. Homeland Security brought in a bomb-sniffing K-9 to search. No explosives were recovered but the district’s emergency protocols were put to the test.

Fern Ridge Middle School administrators were the first to find the threat spray painted on two walls. Superintendent Dennis Fredrick arrived soon after.

Jes Burns

Earlier this week, 4J Schools Superintendent Sheldon Berman recommended the sale of the Civic Stadium properties to the City of Eugene, over competing bids from Fred Meyer and the YMCA.  A final decision by the 4J Board is still two weeks away.  Wednesday night, Board members heard community response to the recommendation.

Berman: “This has been a long process…”

Jes Burns

Eugene Superintendent Shelley Berman announced Monday he would recommend the 4j School Board negotiate purchase of Civic Stadium with the City of Eugene. The price would be four point five million dollars. 

YMCA Executive Director Dave Perez Tuesday voiced disappointment while still holding out hope:

Perez:  “We really felt that our proposal offered the community and the School District some tremendous long-term benefits. We don’t think we’re out of it yet. The Board still has to make a decision on the 19th, and we’ll just see what kind of happens then.”

Karen Richards

Here's a quiz. What two languages are taught at North Eugene High School? Spanish is the first. But the second? It's Japanese. The school received a grant today (Tuesday) from the Japanese Consul General.

Nathan Goldberg starts his Japanese 1 class at North Eugene High School. Down the hall, a Japanese 3 class begins. Overall, 120 students at the school are studying the language. Consul General Hiroshi Furusawa says Oregon has a strong Japanese language presence:

Furusawa: "This state, per capita, number two, after Hawaii."

Jes Burns

This month, the Eugene 4J School Board is expected to make its decision about the fate of Civic Stadium.

4J Superintendent Sheldon Berman is expected to announce his recommendation at 4 p.m. Monday. Proposals from Fred Meyer, Eugene YMCA and The City of Eugene to purchase the property are each being considered. Eugene School district spokeswoman Kerry Delf says the School Board makes the ultimate decision February 19th.

Bethel School District

Students at Eugene's Bethel School District will get five days back in their academic calendar this spring.

That's a combination of make up days for last month's snowstorm and a better budget outlook. The district is adding the 5 days back the week following spring break. That week in April had been scheduled as Budget Reduction Days. Bethel Superintendent Colt Gill says the district surveyed students, parents and staff.

Last (Monday) night, the Eugene 4J budget committee presented projections for next year. Although the situation has improved, the school district will have to make compromises.

The overall reaction to the early school budget forecast has been positive. Eugene 4J spokesperson Kerry Delf:

"We are looking forward to a year next year that is much less of a financial challenge than this year and some past years have been."

Rachael McDonald

College textbooks are too expensive and many students can't afford them. The Oregon Student Public Interest Research Group released a national survey Monday on textbook costs and alternatives.

Lane Community College Student Body President Paul Zito says he has only bought 4 textbooks in the 3 years he's been a student. He takes a normal course-load but he can't afford the books. Instead Zito looks for the information himself.

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