Environment & Planning

Wikimedia Commons

California is four years into a historic drought, and water for human use is vying with the water needs of wildlife, such as threatened salmon.

In parts of northern California, an explosive and unregulated increase in marijuana cultivation is contributing to the problem. Now, a study says the impact of pot grows on fish-bearing streams is threatening their survival.

Researchers monitoring water levels in streams in Humboldt and Mendocino Counties last summer say the water impacts of cannabis grow operations are dramatic.

US Forest Service

The U.S. Forest Service has engaged the public in Seattle, Portland and Redding, California on the need for a new Northwest Forest Plan.  Now it’s moving its road show to smaller communities.

Lisa Romano, speaking for the Siuslaw National Forest Research Station, says at least a dozen local community sessions will be held in upcoming weeks. After introductions from forest service staff, participants will be called on to discuss three questions:

Cascadia Wildlands

It’s been more than twenty years since the Northwest Forest Plan set out to ease tensions in the “Timber Wars” of Oregon, Washington and Northern California.

The plan signaled a historic shift in how public lands were managed – focusing efforts on maintaining biodiversity instead of keeping timber production high.

Now the Forest Plan is up for revision, a process Northwesterners will be hearing about often in the coming years. But how did we get here?

Portland, Oregon. April. 1993.

Cascadia Wildlands

Federal wildlife officials are taking a new look at the status of the threatened northern spotted owl. Despite decades of efforts to save the species, it could soon be considered endangered.

A California conservation group petitioned the Department of the Interior in 2012 to change the status of the spotted owl under the Endangered Species Act. The group argued that owl populations are still on the decline because of habitat loss and the incursion of the barred owl, especially in Washington and Northern Oregon.

Joey is crowd funding to raise money for his scientific studies. For more information, click here:


Brian Davies / Register Guard (pool)

A Lane County Judge heard arguments Tuesday in a case brought by two youth against the state of Oregon. The suit asks for more to be done by leaders to prevent climate change.

Eugene teens Olivia Chernaik and Kelsey Juliana originally filed brought the suit four years ago. They're asking Judge Karsten Rasmussen to include the atmosphere as a public trust as is already the case with land and water. Attorney Chris Winter explained to reporters after the hearing.

Willamette Riverkeeper has filed a 60 day notice to sue against Bartels Packing. The notice documents several Clean Water Act violations by the Eugene based meat packing company located near Fern Ridge Reservoir.

Willamette Riverkeeper says Bartels butchers cattle onsite. The 60 day notice documents the discharging of blood wastes from Bartels slaughterhouse into the Fern Ridge Reservoir.

Riverkeeper Executive Director Travis Williams says, “the reason [they] sent the 60 day notice is [they] feel there is a reasonable potential for these types of violations to continue.”

Rachael McDonald

A lawsuit brought against the state by two Eugene teens will finally get its day in court Tuesday. The suit asks the Oregon governor to do more to prevent climate change.

Olivia Chernaik and Kelsey Juliana will appear in Lane County District Court before Judge Karsten Rasmussen. Their case asks the judge to recognize that lawmakers hold natural resources, including air and water, in public trust and those resources must be preserved for the future.

Kelsey Juliana was a freshman in high school when she first filed the lawsuit. Now she's a freshman in college.

Chafer Machinery

Few people come into contact with farm chemicals the way agricultural workers do. That's why a new health report on a commonly used herbicide is raising special concerns about farmworkers and cancer.

For years, researchers have seen glyphosate as one of the least harmful herbicides. It doesn’t cause very many acute poisonings. But now the World Health Organization has said there’s “limited evidence” long-term exposure can cause non-Hodgkin lymphoma in people.

Recorded on: March 27th, 2015

Air Date: March 30th, 2015

Many Oregon forest managers seek to balance long-term economic value with a conservation ethic. With the ecology in mind, speakers from two consulting companies based in Oregon will focus on timber harvesting and management of forestlands as small as 10 acres and as large as 10,000 acres. The speakers will also discuss Siuslaw National Forest projects that conduct logging within a framework of ecosystem restoration.