Environment

Environment & Planning

City Club of Eugene - Oregon’s Geology: Scientists Warn of Hazards, But Do Lawmakers & Agencies Respond?

Meeting date: October 10, 2014

KLCC air date: October 13, 2014

Natural disasters are often followed by a period of public reflection: Did anyone know something like this could happen? Had we taken precautions to prevent and minimize the damage from the earthquake, hurricane, flood or other event that just turned life upside down?

www.noaa.gov

This Columbus Day weekend, those heading to the Oregon Coast should be extra cautious. There is a potential for deadly sneaker waves in the next few days.

Sneaker waves are sudden, unexpected waves that reach farther up the beach than normal. Mark Spilde is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. He says conditions exist for sporadic waves up to 18 feet high:

howlingforjustice.wordpress.com

More funds will soon be available to Oregon farmers and landowners who choose to use non-lethal deterrent techniques for wolves.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture just received a $53,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to be used for non-lethal preventative measures. Those may include barriers, alarms, or animals to guard the livestock. ODA Program Director Jason Barber says the most efficient method to prevent wolf attacks are range riders.

Alexi Horowitz / Earthfix

As hunting season begins across the Pacific Northwest, Oregon conservationists and state agencies are taking a new look at the issue of lead ammunition and its effects on wildlife.

Inside the operating room at the Portland Audubon Society Wildlife Care Center head veterinarian Deb Shaeffer is carefully inserting a syringe into the shoulder of an injured red-tail hawk.

Shaeffer: “It’s a very simple blood draw, it takes one drop of blood, and we run it through a machine, and it takes about three minutes and we get a result back.”

Wikimedia Commons

A controversial nickel mining project in a roadless area of Southwestern Oregon has failed to clear an early hurdle. The state has denied a UK-based company permission to use water from a small creek.

It’s difficult to use water when there’s no water flowing. Or so discovered Red Flat Nickel Corporation when the State of Oregon denied its application to use water for five years.

oregonriverguides.com

A remarkable rebound for salmon in Oregon has led to a bountiful fishing season. It's also meant fishing quotas are being met early, resulting in the closure of one river.

Wild coho season on the Umpqua River will end October first, when biologists predict the quota of 2,000 fish will be met. Jessica Sall is with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

Sall: "We do want to remind anglers that the river is still open for hatchery coho, or those fish that have their adipose fin clipped."

Rachael McDonald

People walking Oregon's beaches this fall may come across juvenile shorebirds that seem to be distressed or ill. Wildlife experts say it's best to leave them be.

The Common Murre is a small shorebird with black and white feathers, kind of like a mini- penguin. This time of year, the young ones have just fledged and are learning to feed themselves.
Laura Todd is with US Fish and Wildlife's Newport field office. She says some of them don't survive. If you come across a bird that's not moving and seems weak and unwell…

osumg.blogspot.com

People holding outdoor gatherings might be facing intrusions from wasps and yellow jackets. As summer winds down, the insects are likely searching for protein-rich food before overwintering.

According to the Oregon Department of Agriculture, many people assume applying pesticides to their flower beds will get rid of the nuisances. But many products end up harming honeybees instead. ODA spokeswoman Rose Kachadoorian says spraying insecticides around the yard won't do much good.

Billmoyers.com

Hundreds of people gathered in downtown Eugene Sunday to rally for more action on climate change. This is in solidarity with a Global Climate march focused on the United Nations Climate Summit taking place this week in New York.

The biggest climate march in history is happening on Sunday, and Oregon is joining in. Events around the world will bring together hundreds of organizations in a call for action to protect the air, food and water.

Demonstrations are centered in New York City, where a U.N. Climate Summit takes place Tuesday. The gathering in New York is expected to attract over 200-thousand people. Local rallies are planned for several Oregon communities, including Eugene.

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