NPR Music

World Cafe
12:50 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Little Comets On World Cafe

Little Comets.
Courtesy of the artist

Little Comets, a trio from Newcastle upon Tyne, England, recently released its U.S. debut, Life Is Elsewhere. Described early in its career as a British Vampire Weekend, the band smoothly incorporates tricky percussive rhythms and Afrobeat-tinged guitars.

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All Songs Considered
10:34 am
Wed October 2, 2013

First Watch: Jacco Gardner, 'The End Of August'

Courtesy of the artist

Somehow this young Dutch musician has managed to capture an aesthetic that happened 20 years before he was born. Jacco Gardner makes music in the spirit of early 1960s baroque pop bands, such as The Left Banke (a group that featured a harpsichord) or late '60s Kinks, and certainly The Zombies from their Odessey and Oracle period. Gardner channels these sounds on a new song and trippy video called "The End Of August."

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Music Reviews
9:57 am
Wed October 2, 2013

On 'Days Are Gone,' Three Sisters HAIM It Up

HAIM.
Tom Beard Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:28 am

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The Record
9:29 am
Wed October 2, 2013

This Beat's For You: The Making Of Drake's 'Furthest Thing'

Producer Jake One in Seattle in 2011.
Kyle Johnson for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 8:33 am

The journey of a song from farm to table, so to speak, is not something listeners are likely to consider in the course of absorbing an album. And that's for the best. The song is part of a longer narrative. It fits and then is over. In the context of a longplay, its own story is not meant to be lingered on.

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Classics in Concert
8:32 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Gustavo Dudamel And The LA Philharmonic Celebrate 10 Years In Disney Hall

Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic celebrate the 10th anniversary of Walt Disney Concert Hall in a special gala concert.
Vern Evans

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 6:50 am

Not unlike childbirth, the odyssey of fits and starts that preceded the completion of Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles hurt like hell at the time. But today, 10 years later, Angelenos marvel on a daily basis at architect Frank Gehry's dazzling offspring: the incandescent beauty of its billowing metallic sails, especially at dusk, in L.A.'s famed purple-pink fading light; its iconic status as an architectural symbol of the city and its warm and vibrant acoustics.

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Thistle and Shamrock
8:03 am
Wed October 2, 2013

The Thistle And Shamrock: Nuala Kennedy And A.J. Roach

A.J. Roach and Nuala Kennedy.
Louis DeCarlo Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:15 am

Hear how two musicians, raised over 4,000 miles apart, share a deep musical connection. Flute player and singer Nuala (pronounced Noo-la) Kennedy is from the east coast of Ireland; singer and songwriter A.J. Roach was raised in southwestern Virginia. Nuala grew up with many Ulster ballads and tunes that were carried across the ocean to take root in the mountains and hollows of A.J.'s homeland. Fiona chats with the pair and delves into their individual recordings.

Music News
12:32 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Gospel's Blind Boys Meet Changing Times With Open Minds

I'll Find a Way is the latest album in The Blind Boys of Alabama's seven-decade run. Left to right: Ricky McKinnie, Paul Beasley, Jimmy Carter, Ben Moore, Joey Williams.
Cameron Wittig Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 8:56 am

The men behind the new album I'll Find a Way may be in their 70s and 80s today — but they're still The Blind Boys of Alabama.

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Music Reviews
2:15 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Steady And Swingin': Tootie Keeps The Tempo

From left: pianist Ethan Iverson, drummer Albert "Tootie" Heath and bassist Ben Street.
John Rogers Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 3:38 pm

Since playing on John Coltrane's first release in 1957, drummer Albert "Tootie" Heath has participated in a number of landmark jazz records. Now 78, the musician is featured in a new trio session with players nearly half his age — pianist Ethan Iverson of The Bad Plus and bassist Ben Street.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:05 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Chronicle Of A Death Foretold: New York City Opera Shuts Its Doors

The New York City Opera let its final curtain fall Saturday night at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in a production of Anna Nicole by Mark-Anthony Turnage.
Stephanie Berger

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 3:16 pm

This morning the New York City Opera announced that it was declaring bankruptcy and ceasing operations. Dubbed "The People's Opera" by Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia when it was founded 70 years ago, the company was meant as an alternative to the richer Metropolitan Opera. It's the place where exciting young singers like Beverly Sills and Placido Domingo made their New York debuts and where innovative productions of new operas premiered.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:26 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Minnesota Orchestra Conductor Resigns After Carnegie Hall Cancellations

Conductor Osmo Vanska, who resigned his post at the Minnesota Orchestra this morning.
Todd Buchanan Courtesy of the Minnesota Orchestra

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 8:14 am

The latest chapter in the saga of the Minnesota Orchestra closed at a perilous point Tuesday morning, with its widely beloved conductor, Osmo Vänskä, announcing his resignation.

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