Politics & Government

Politics & Government

Lane County Puts 3 Percent Pot Tax On November Ballot

Aug 4, 2016
Lode Van de Velde

Lane County residents in unincorporated areas will vote on a measure to levy a local three percent tax on recreational pot in November.

Recorded on: July 29th, 2016

Air date: August 1st, 2016

Speakers:

Don Hann, USDA Forest Service

Earlier this year, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names determined that 13 sites in Oregon’s Grant County would drop the word “squaw”.   This aligns with a 2001 state law banning the word for public areas.  Now as KLCC’s Brian Bull in Eugene reports, a county official hopes the federal government will allow two place names to be used over those proposed by local Indian tribes. 

Rachael McDonald

The Eugene City Council Wednesday approved a 10-year property tax exemption for a developer to build apartments downtown. This is the first time the city has granted a Multi-Use Property Tax Exemption since it changed the controversial practice.

Matt Keating

Bernie Sanders supporters made their frustration known on the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Even when Sanders spoke, he received boos when he pledged his support for Hillary Clinton.

Auction.com

The Eugene City Council voted 5-3 Monday to give a Singapore-based semiconductor manufacturer 2 extra years of property tax exemptions. Broadcom, formerly Avago Technologies bought the former Hynix plant last year for $21 million.

gofundme

Eugene’s Matt Keating took the train across the country to attend the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

www.merkley.senate.gov

Democrats meet in Philadelphia this week to nominate Hillary Clinton for President. Oregon's U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley is a superdelegate to the convention, but he will not cast his vote for the former secretary of state.

Wikimedia commons

Springfield residents will vote on two tax measures in November. One is a gas tax for street repairs. The other is a local tax on pot sales.

www.merkley.senate.gov

Most states require voters to head to their nearest polling place each election, but since 1998 Oregonians have voted by mail. However, a new Senate bill wants to extend the practice to the rest of the country.

Pages