Science & Technology

Science & Technology

Why The Nuclear Energy World Is Thinking Small

Mar 23, 2015
Jes Burns / Earthfix

In the world of nuclear power, one technology is generating debate: factory-produced reactors that are no bigger than a house. A bill to help bring smaller reactors to Washington is working its way through the state Legislature.  At the same time, work is underway in Oregon to bring these small-scale reactors to market.

There’s only one place in the country right now that is developing a new kind of nuclear power plant.

It’s happening in an office building on a sprawling corporate campus just outside Corvallis, Oregon.

A pilot program will test whether Oregon should offer iPads at no cost to assist residents who have vision, hearing, speech, mobility or cognition issues. The iPads will improve phone communication, but will have no download capability and only limited internet access. The program is funded with a nine cent monthly surcharge on retail telephone bills.  Friday is the new deadline to join the pilot project. For more information, email puc.rspf@state.or.us , or call 800-848-4442.

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area

Yaquina Head Lighthouse re-opened last weekend to tours after being closed for 3 months. The 1872 lighthouse in Newport has been repainted.

Robot Milkers Bring New Future to Washington Dairy Farmers

Jan 2, 2015
Sarah Eden Wallace

Washington dairy farmers are beginning to use new technology that is transforming how time is spent on the farm. It's also helping provide much needed support for the next generation of small family farms.

Alan Mesman’s family has been farming for six generations near La Conner. So he knows first hand how hard dairying can be.

“Usually between 5:30 and 6 we start. In the summertime, I mean, you can be going from 5 in the morning til 10 at night.”

www.oregonlive.com

Oregon State University needs help cataloging tens of millions of plankton photos. The university is offering 175 thousand dollars for computer algorithms that will sort the photos.

The National Data Science bowl was announced on Monday. The competition was initiated to seek the classification of plankton data gathered from a Florida expedition last summer.

Jessica Luo, a PhD student based at the Hatfield Marine Science center in Newport says the plankton photos are used to study the predator and prey relationships between larval fish.

People text donations, they text votes to reality shows, now they can text a power outage. In time for winter weather, the Eugene Water and Electric Board has launched a new reporting service.

EWEB spokesman Joe Harwood says when their system was overloaded in February’s snowstorm, they started working on a solution. During that storm they also had to educate some younger customers who didn’t know they had to tell EWEB when their power was out:

www.nnmrec.oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University's Marine Renewable Energy program has been awarded new federal funding. The additional cash will help them get closer to connecting wave power to the grid.

Oregon State and the University of Washington were selected in 2008 to form one of three centers to research wave and tidal energy.

Belinda Batten is a Director for the program. She says for two years, they've had an offshore test site north of Yaquina Head, where they've been studying the size and force of waves. The new funding will help them move forward:

Oregon State University

Researchers at Oregon State University have found trace levels of radiation from Fukushima in albacore tuna caught off the Oregon coast. Results of the study are being published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was destroyed by the earthquake that hit Japan in 2011. Radiation has made its way into the Pacific Ocean, raising concerns about exposure to Cesium-134 and 137.

USGS

The Eugene Water and Electric Board hopes to start repairing Leaburg Dam as soon as May. The cost to fix the 83-year-old structure on the McKenzie River is projected to be $2.8 million. That's about twice the previous estimate.

The motor in one of the dam's three roll gates failed in 2012. The gate has been in the down position ever since.  The roll-gates regulate how much water flows through the dam, which generates power for about 10-thousand homes. Joe Harwood is spokesman for EWEB. He says it's not surprising the first cost estimate of $1.2 million was off.

Steve O'Connell

Everyday people are exposed to chemicals and pollutants. Researchers at Oregon State University in Corvallis have developed a silicone wristband that can detect these compounds. The new accessory can help scientists understand the link between exposure to toxins and disease. The wristband looks similar to the ubiquitous colorful rubber wristbands that often promote causes or charities, such as breast cancer. Kim Anderson is a professor in the OSU Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology.

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