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Oregon.gov

Oregon’s unemployment rate of 5.5 for June is slightly higher than the national average. That’s according to numbers released by the state’s employment department. The jobless rate increased in Lane and Douglas counties as well.

The increase in unemployment in both counties is due to growth in the labor force. Regional economist Brian Rooney says when college students graduate in June, they’re added to the labor force. They’re also added to the unemployment rate.

Lindsay Eyink

UPDATED Thursday 11:47am

Voters in Jackson and Josephine Counties last year approved county-wide bans on the cultivation of genetically-modified crops. Backers of those measures fear a bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives today would roll back those bans – as well as scores of other GMO-related measures across the country.

Liam Moriarty / JPR

This week, Jefferson Public Radio’s Liam Moriarty is introducing us to several people with a front-row view of Southern Oregon’s epidemic of heroin and opioid addiction. In this final part of the series, we meet 27-year-old Diana Cooper. She’s a mother of four from Medford -- and a recovering heroin addict.

Funds Approved For Ex-offender Housing In Eugene

Jul 22, 2015
Rachael McDonald

Oregon Governor Kate Brown has announced state funding awards for 13 affordable housing developments. They will include a Eugene project for ex offenders looking to make a new start. 

Oaks at 14th will offer 54 units on oak patch rd in west Eugene.  The one bedroom apartments will provide permanent, affordable housing to ex offenders who have been successful in transitional housing facilities.  Steve Ochs is with the Lane County Housing Agency, which will oversee the development:

Residents in the rural community of Pleasant Hill have a new option when it comes to health care. As KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert reports, an urgent care clinic is now open for business.

Pleasant Hill Urgent Care may not have an expensive cat-scan or ultrasound. They don’t admit patients or perform surgery. But they do provide primary care. They offer x-ray services and can give I-V fluids and meds. If you need a bone set or a wound sutured, medical staff at this clinic can do it.

And no one will be turned away, even the uninsured.

Rachael McDonald

Benton County leaders are considering asking voters to fund a new jail. They say the existing jail is inadequate for public safety needs.

The Benton County Jail was built in 1976. It has enough room for up to 40 inmates. The county is renting beds at other jails making it possible for the county to hold up to 80 offenders. Sheriff's Captain Diana Rabago says the jail has a virtual revolving door with people getting released early due to overcrowding. She says the jail uses a matrix to determine who is next on the list to be force released.

Photo by Eric Alan

The Icelandic band Arstidir is making their first tour through the United States, after becoming a sensation in their home country shortly after their formation in 2008, right after the stock market crash there. Undeterred by economic troubles, volcanic eruptions and so forth, they’ve found a worldwide audience for their music—including one song having more than four million views on YouTube. Arstidir’s music includes an emphasis on vocal harmony, and influences from classical to folk and rock.

More than 1600 acres of old growth rainforest have burned in Washington’s Olympic National Park.
Firefighters are mounting a difficult response in a remote river valley. This is the largest fire in the park’s history, but it’s not the first to burn in the rainforests of the Olympics.

Singer, songwriter and activist Melissa Etheridge has earned seventeen Grammy nominations and an Academy Award. She’s touring across more than fifty cities this summer, including on Wednesday, July 22nd at The Courtyard of the Athletic Club of Bend. She speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan in an interview that includes music from her new release, This is M.E.

Silent Epidemic: Heroin In Southern Oregon Part Three

Jul 22, 2015
Liam Moriarty / JPR

This week, Jefferson Public Radio’s Liam Moriarty is introducing us to people with a front-row view of Southern Oregon’s epidemic of addiction to heroin and prescription painkillers. Today, we meet Darryl Inaba. He’s a Doctor of Clinical Pharmacy and co-author of “Uppers, Downers, All Arounders,” a book on addiction and the brain that’s widely used as a training text.

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