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Author Keith Scribner has been the recipient of a New York Times Notable Book of the Year award, as well as being chosen for the Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers Series. His new novel, The Oregon Experiment, details the life of a family moving to a small Oregon town from the East Coast. Eric Alan talks to Keith Scribner, before his coastal appearance in the Writers On the Edge Series.

City of Eugene.

The Eugene City Council Monday voted 6 to 2 to allow small homeless camps. I spoke with City Councilor Claire Syrett Tuesday to get more details on the ordinance. Syrett says it was proposed by City Manager John Ruiz who will bring the council a list of potential sites on public or private property or religious and non-profit organizations.
Claire Syrett spoke with KLCC's Rachael McDonald.

First, it was Washington and Colorado. Now, Oregon is in the running to legalize marijuana. Supporters are gathering signatures for a pair of initiatives to allow pot for recreational purposes. But here’s something that hasn’t happened in any other state: Oregon lawmakers are actually thinking seriously about taking on the issue.

Halie Loren has just released a new recording in the U.S. called "Simply Love". It has already reached #1 on the Japanese billboard Jazz chart, having been released there some time ago. Ms. Loren visited the KLCC studio to play with her trio with Matt Treder on piano, and Mark Schneider on bass. She plays a CD release party this Saturday night at the Wildish Theatre in Springfield.

Rachael McDonald

The Republican-controlled House has approved a bill to sharply increase logging in national forests. It includes a plan drafted by members of Oregon's congressional delegation to raise money for beleaguered counties.

The O & C Bill sets aside about million acres of Oregon's public land for preservation. Another million or so would be managed under the state forest practices act. Timber harvest revenue would help counties like Lane. Sid Leiken is Chair of the Lane County Board of Commissioners.

Federal Cuts To Food Stamp Program Will Hurt Oregon

Sep 23, 2013

Last week, the House of Representatives voted to cut nearly 40 billion dollars from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAPS. The decision will influence more than 800,000 Oregonians currently enrolled in the program.

Jessica Robinson

Take a drive down any highway in the Northwest, and you'll pass signs for dozens of small towns. There are more than 700 cities under 10,000 people in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Many of these towns came about because of railroads or timber or mines and now they're trying to figure out what comes next. Today, we begin an occasional series on Northwest small towns.

A major collection of Arctic artifacts has found a new home at the University of Oregon's Museum of Natural and Cultural History. The collection of more than 5,000 artifacts is part of a transfer between the U of O and Western Oregon University. WOU decided to cease operation of its Jensen Museum this year because of financial problems. State Representative Nancy Nathanson from Eugene helped to secure more than 900,000 dollars as part of a statewide mission to preserve significant collections.

Angela Kellner

Nature has the power to destroy and to heal. Eight years ago Hurricane Katrina ravaged the Gulf Coast, hitting New Orleans especially hard. One family made the difficult choice to flee their place of birth for a new life in Oregon.

The eldest daughter has had a difficult time adjusting and finding her way. This summer she and her younger sister enrolled in a five-week job training program in the woods with Northwest Youth Corps.

August: Osage County is the Putlitzer Prize-winning play by Tracy Letts, which opens Oregon Contemporary Theatre's new season in Eugene. Eric Alan talks with director Tara Wibrew and OCT artistic director Craig Willis about the darkly comedic play, and its universally relevant reflections about

family.

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