News

Groundwater Levels Dropping In Klamath Basin

Aug 12, 2015
Jes Burns / Earthfix

Groundwater levels in Oregon’s Klamath Basin have dropped as much as 25-feet in the past fifteen years. A new report shows there is a relationship between the declines and pumping by farmers in the region.

Rachael McDonald

The 5-thousand classified workers at Oregon's 7 public universities are negotiating with administration for a new contract. The old one expired in June. These are the people who clean classrooms, shelve books and cook for students.

"My name is Shawna Schultz, and I am a food service worker."

Schults works in Carson Hall, one of the U of O dorm buildings.

Schultz: "I supervise students. Teach them the rules of the kitchen and we service our guests and also maintain a very safe environment for our students."

KLCC

If you've always wanted to work for the TSA, now's your chance. The Transportation Security Administration is hiring full and part time workers at the Eugene Airport.

To be one of those people who runs the x-ray machine and pats down passengers traveling by air, you have to be at least 18. Applicants also must be high school graduates, American citizens, or U.S. nationals, and speak English proficiently.

Nico Melendez is a TSA spokesman out of Los Angeles. He acknowledges the job can be tough.

Mjpresson Wikimedia

Monday night, the Roseburg City Council voted narrowly to allow the sale of recreational pot in medical marijuana dispensaries starting in October. Following passionate testimony and deliberations, the Council decided--5 to 3— not to ban recreational pot sales through the city's five medical marijuana dispensaries.

Steve Kaser has been a Roseburg city councilor for 6 years. He says the arguments went back and forth. One was that neither the city nor Douglas County supported Measure 91 to legalize marijuana statewide. So, the city should be allowed to choose its own fate now.

Vocalist Marisa Frantz is a native of Eugene who returned after several musical years in Nashville, and is a part of the Oregon Festival of American Music for the first time. She speaks with Eric Alan about balancing a reverence for vocal tradition while still making classic songs her own. She’ll be a featured vocalist in OFAM’s opening gala, which will be broadcast by KLCC on Tuesday evening, August 11th, during Heartwood Hotel.

Photo Jenny Graham

“The Happiest Song Plays Last,” now at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Thomas Theatre, is part three of a trilogy by Quiara Alegria Hudes. Last year the Festival presented part two, “Water by the Spoonful,” directed, like this play, by Shishir Kurup.
The author, inspired by her cousin Elliot, the youngest Marine to be deployed to Iraq, has stitched his story to others, creating a colorful quilt of present-day issues.

https://act.everytown.org

Oregon’s new gun background check law took effect yesterday [Sunday]. The legislation requires all gun sales, including private exchanges, to be vetted through a federally licensed dealer.

With the new law, Oregon becomes the 12th state to require universal background checks. Legislators hope criminal and mental health checks for private and online sales will reduce gun violence in the state. Amy Ruiz is with the Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund:

Stouts Creek Fire Facebook page

Oregon's biggest wildfire is 40 percent contained. The Stouts Creek Fire in Douglas County has burned more than 23 thousand acres.

In the first of two features on the Oregon Festival of Music 2015, Eric Alan speaks with Jim Ralph, Executive Director of the Shedd Institute. Jim talks about the transformative musical era from 1921 to 1934, and how it will be represented onstage during Tuesday evening’s opening gala. That concert will be broadcast live on KLCC during Heartwood Hotel, which begins at 7:30 p.m.

Lane Blood Center

The Lane Blood Center needs donations, and they want to help wildland firefighters. They're hoping the community will answer the call with two charity events this month.

With people on summer vacation and college students away until the fall, there are fewer blood donors available. And local traumas have depleted inventories of o blood types.

Vignos: "We need O types, which is O negative and O positive. And we also need A positive blood right now."

That's Cynthia Vignos with Lane Blood Center.

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