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www.blacksheepgathering.org

You won’t see many white sheep at this weekend’s  Black Sheep Gathering at the Lane County Fairgrounds. The show was founded 41 years ago to preserve the genetics of black, brown and grey animals.

The event began in the mid-1970s with gatherings held at people’s homes. It’s grown every year and this year will take over the convention space as well as the expo barns at the fairgrounds. Wayne Thompson has been involved for 35 years:

Jes Burns / Earthfix

Drought is creating problems in river systems all around the Northwest. Nowhere is this more evident than on the Klamath River in Southern Oregon and Northern California.

Scientists there say there’s not enough cool water flowing, and a fish kill of young Chinook [shin-’nook] salmon is likely.

Releasing more water from upstream reservoirs could help the fish stay healthy.
 

Eugene voters could see a property tax levy on the November ballot to help fund library services. The City Council discussed several options at its Wednesday work session. The previous library levy was allowed to expire four years ago. The Sheldon, Bethel and downtown branches now receive about 10-million dollars a year from the city's general fund. But the needs of other departments, as well as increased benefits and payroll costs have led to cuts in library hours.

The John G. Shedd Institute for the Arts launches its 2015 theatricals season with the classic musical, How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying, a satire of 1950s corporate America. Director Peg Major speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan, in an interview that includes music from the 2011 cast recording with Daniel Radcliffe. The play runs June 19th through 28th in the Jaqua Concert Hall in Eugene.

Oregon State Parks

Planners are gathering information about trails at Honeyman State Park in Florence. There's a public meeting Thursday evening.

Dan Ayres / Washington Dept. of Fish & Wildlife

The west coast is seeing the largest bloom of toxic algae in more than a decade. It's led to the closure of some commercial crab and shellfisheries in Oregon, Washington and California.
 

Wildlife managers spotted a sea lion in Longview, Washington that was arching its back, and then having seizures. They had to euthanize it.

The cause?

Pseudo-nitzchia. It’s a type of algae that releases a neurotoxin. If people eat shellfish or crabs contaminated with it, they can also suffer seizures, short term memory loss and even death.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

At high-end grocers in Paris or Tokyo, wild mushrooms flown in from the Northwest can fetch upwards of $100 a pound. That supply chain invariably begins on a dirty folding table on the side of a backwoods highway. In this second of two reports on the morel mushroom economy, Rowan Moore Gerety takes us to a buying station in the mountain town of Twisp.

Rachael McDonald

Construction is underway for a new rapid transit bus route in West Eugene. The EmX expansion will be funded with $75-million in federal money. A group that opposes the project is still hoping to halt it.

This spring, the sound of roadwork has been audible on Eugene's downtown streets.

Here on the corner of 6th and Charnelton, workers are pouring concrete on a driveway apron.

It's summertime and KLCC needs your help to finish the budget year STRONG!  Your June contribution ensures the resources to bring you NPR news, compelling stories, and enlightened entertainment throughout the coming year.

The police chief of Junction City is suing the municipality and the former City Administrator. Junction City Police Chief Mark Chase says his First Amendments rights were violated. In his complaint, he asserts he was denied due process when then-City Administrator, Melissa Bowers, discriminated against him based on his Christian faith.

Portland attorney Sean Riddell represents the Police Chief.

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