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2:30 am
Thu October 23, 2014

With Bears On The Streets, Canadian Town Cancels Halloween

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now this. Winter comes early in the Canadian Arctic, which means polar bear season.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Education
2:30 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Wave Away Math Homework With An App

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. Suppose you need the answer to 70 times five?

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's 350.

INSKEEP: Or 12 times four.

GREENE: 48.

INSKEEP: That's impressive, David.

GREENE: Well, thank you.

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Europe
2:30 am
Thu October 23, 2014

How Much Would You Pay For A Putin-Themed Music Box?

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Latin America
1:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Mexican Prosecutor Says Mayor, Wife Ordered Attack On Students

In Mexico City on Wednesday, people march to demand justice for 43 missing students. Mexican authorities ordered the arrest of the mayor of Iguala and his wife in connection with the attack.
Yuri Cortez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:59 am

Mexico's top prosecutor says a mayor and his wife ordered the attack on 43 students who have been missing for nearly a month. The couple — of the town of Iguala in the southern state of Guerrero — are now fugitives.

Thousands of protesters marched down Mexico City's grand Reforma Boulevard on Wednesday night, banging drums, carrying pictures of the 43 students who went missing on Sept. 26, and demanding the resignation of the governor of the state of Guerrero and even of President Enrique Pena Nieto.

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Parallels
1:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Israel's Defense Minister: Mideast Borders 'Absolutely' Will Change

Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alon delivers a statement at the Israel Defense Forces headquarters in Jerusalem in June.
Thomas Coex AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:40 pm

Israel's Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alon is known for his blunt manner, and in an interview with NPR, he says a future map of the Middle East will look very different from the one that exists today.

The borders of many Arab states were drawn up by Westerners a century ago, and wars in recent years show that a number of them are doomed to break apart, according to Ya'alon, a career soldier who became Israel's defense minister last year.

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Goats and Soda
1:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Ebola Is Keeping Kids From Getting Vaccinated In Liberia

A mom at the Community Clinic in Louisiana Township, about 15 miles from Monrovia, says all her children have been vaccinated.
Jon Hamilton NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:21 am

When Ebola began killing people in the Monrovia suburb of Clara Town several months ago, some residents blamed vaccines.

One vaccinator in the town says mothers didn't want her near their babies.

"They had a notion that when the people come to the hospital, we would inject them and kill them," says vaccinator Che Che Richardson at the Clara Town Health Center, "because it was the hospital giving the people Ebola."

Rumors like that, combined with the closing of many health facilities, have caused childhood vaccinations rates to plummet in Liberia.

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NPR Story
4:46 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

B.C. Energy Minister Says U.S. Has A Good Deal In Columbia River Treaty

The Columbia River at Rowena, Oregon.

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 7:44 pm

A little-known fact about Columbia River dams is that a valuable chunk of the power generated on the U.S. side goes to Canada under an international treaty.

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The Two-Way
4:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

New Autopsy Report Suggests Michael Brown Was Shot At Close Range

Lesley McSpadden, right, the mother of 18-year-old Michael Brown, watches as Brown's father, Michael Brown Sr., holds up a family picture of himself, his son, top left in photo, and a young child during a news conference Monday, Aug. 11, in Ferguson, Mo.
Jeff Roberson AP

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch has published the official autopsy report on the shooting death of Michael Brown, the black, 18-year-old whose death at the hands of a white police officer set off weeks of protests this summer and fall in Ferguson, Mo.

The report suggests that Brown was shot at close range by Officer Darren Wilson. A toxicology report accompanying the autopsy report suggests Brown had marijuana in his system at the time of his death on August 9.

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Environment
2:26 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

The San Luis Reservoir in central California is the largest "off-channel" reservoir in the U.S. It is currently at less than 30 percent of its normal capacity.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:44 pm

The past few years have been California's driest on record. Forecasters predict that punishing droughts like the current one could become the new norm.

The state uses water rationing and a 90-year-old water distribution system to cope until the rains come. The system is a huge network of dams, canals and pipes that move water from the places it rains and snows to places it typically doesn't, like farms and cities.

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The Two-Way
2:07 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

NHTSA Adds More Than 3 Million Vehicles To Air Bag Recall

Takata Ignition Systems in Schoenebeck, Germany, which makes air bags. Millions of automobiles have been recalled because of a defect in the air bags' inflators.
Jens Meyer AP

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has once again changed the number of cars included in a massive and urgent recall over an inflator defect in air bags made by the Japanese company Takata.

Initially, 4.7 million vehicles were recalled, but in a list released on Wednesday, NHTSA added 3.1 million additional vehicles.

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