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Tribal members are waiting for the next move from British Columbia’s provincial government in a long-running battle over sovereign rights. Last month, a British Columbia Supreme Court judge ruled against the province, siding with a Washington man in an illegal hunting case.

Recent scientific reviews have found substantial evidence that marijuana can be useful in easing at least some types of chronic pain. Yet even for the majority of Americans who live in states that have legalized medical marijuana, choosing opioids can be much cheaper.

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Medical marijuana is legal in 29 states. In Vermont, it's been allowed for more than a decade. Yet medical patients can still have a hard time affording it. Vermont Public Radio's Emily Corwin has more.

"Fast" Eddie Clarke, guitarist for the original three-piece formation of Motörhead, died Wednesday evening after a bout with pneumonia, the band's manager Todd Singerman confirmed to NPR. He was 67.

"Fast Eddie was an integral part of the Motörhead family," a statement from Springerman reads, "and I have to say I was shocked and saddened when word reached me last night that he had passed. Eddie was the last of the Three Amigos (as that classic line-up was called) still walking, but now the trio are reunited."

A bill to ban the controversial practice of trying to change the sexual orientation of LGBTQ people is making its way through the Washington Senate.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

A Baltimore hospital has started an investigation over why a distressed and confused patient was left at a bus stop at night in cold temperatures and wearing just a hospital gown.

A passerby recorded a video Monday showing four security guards walking away from a bus stop next to University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus. One is pushing an empty wheelchair. They appear to have just left the woman at the stop.

The U.S. State Department is warning Americans not to travel to five Mexican states, issuing a "do not travel" advisory.

"Violent crime, such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery, is widespread," the State Department said in the notice Thursday.

A fatal police shooting in Kansas late last month focused attention again on how so-called swatting — prank 911 calls designed to get SWAT teams to deploy — puts lives at risk and burdens police departments.

There are more than 7,000 911 centers in the U.S. and, according to the National Emergency Number Association, they receive about 600,000 calls a day. Authorities don't track swatting calls nationally, though the FBI has been monitoring the practice of those types of fake calls for about a decade.

The Gullah people of coastal Georgia and South Carolina trace their language and culture back to their West and Central African ancestors. Among the Gullah's unique contributions to African-American culture is a deeply distilled repertoire of spirituals and work songs. On the self-titled debut by the quintet Ranky Tanky, Gullah songs are lively, soulful honey to the ears.

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló has asked the Justice Department to investigate the island's public electric utility after federal agents said they found large quantities of critical rebuilding materials stored in a warehouse owned by the public company.

India's only openly gay prince has announced plans to open up his ancestral palace to Indians who have been ostracized for their sexuality or gender identity.

Prince Manvendra Singh Gohil — likely heir to the throne of Rajpipla in the western state of Gujarat — says his center will help provide vulnerable LGBTQ people with the security that typically comes from one's family.

Updated at 7:10 p.m. ET

President Trump on Thursday referred to African nations as "s***hole countries" during a meeting on immigration with a bipartisan group of senators, according to a Democratic aide and another person familiar with the conversation.

Ecuador says it has granted citizenship to Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, as officials try to find a way for him to leave the Ecuadorean embassy in London without risking legal action.

Assange, who is Australian, first sought refuge at the embassy more than five years ago to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he faced an investigation over rape allegations. He was granted asylum, and has been holed up in the embassy ever since.

Environmental groups are applauding New York City’s decision to sue five major oil companies and divest its pension funds of $5 billion in fossil fuel investments.

Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio made the announcement Thursday that the city is suing BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil and Royal Dutch Shell.

When Johnny Cash Met Glen Sherley

Jan 11, 2018

Johnny Cash first performed the song “Greystone Chapel” as part of his legendary recording session at Folsom State Prison near Sacramento, 50 years ago this Saturday. It was also the day Cash met the the song’s author, inmate Glen Sherley.

As Chloe Veltman (@chloeveltman) from KQED reports, the fateful encounter was to change both men’s lives — for better and for worse.

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The Northeast just emerged from a two-week cold spell. In Vermont, temperatures fell to negative 30 degrees Fahrenheit. And in such extreme cold, rural Vermonters have been quickly burning through a precious wintertime commodity - firewood.

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Ever since President Trump opened up DACA negotiations to the news media for an hour - that happened on Tuesday - senators have been meeting in private, trying to close the deal. Arizona Republican Jeff Flake told reporters today it has happened.

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Medical marijuana is legal in 29 states. In Vermont, it's been allowed for more than a decade. Yet medical patients can still have a hard time affording it. Vermont Public Radio's Emily Corwin has more.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Medical marijuana is legal in 29 states. In Vermont, it's been allowed for more than a decade. Yet medical patients can still have a hard time affording it. Vermont Public Radio's Emily Corwin has more.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Medical marijuana is legal in 29 states. In Vermont, it's been allowed for more than a decade. Yet medical patients can still have a hard time affording it. Vermont Public Radio's Emily Corwin has more.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In July, NPR published Turning The Tables, it's list of the 150 Greatest Albums By Women during the "classic album" era. Our occasional listening parties bring together voters to discuss some of their favorites from the list.

Today, we are considering classic albums by two singers who both died too young, but still had time enough to embody the freedom and heartache of their respective generations.

Scientists say that images from Mars show large slopes of ice — and provide a hint at how they were formed. One likely theory involves snowfall on the Red Planet.

The researchers say that the size and accessibility of the ice sheets, as well as the fact that they are made of relatively clean water, could be an important resource for astronauts who might travel to Mars in the future.

"The federal government must take bold action to address inequitable funding in our nation's public schools."

So begins a list of recommendations released Thursday by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, an independent, bipartisan agency created by Congress in 1957 to investigate civil rights complaints. Thursday's report comes after a lengthy investigation into how America's schools are funded and why so many that serve poor and minority students aren't getting the resources they say they need.

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