NPR News

In coal country, thousands of miners have lost jobs. While there aren't any easy solutions, in West Virginia, two farmers are doing what they can to keep wealth in their community and provide healthy food to more people.

In the parking lot of the Five Loaves and Two Fishes Food Bank in McDowell County, squash and basil are growing in 18 tall white towers without any dirt. It's a farming method called hydroponics. The vegetables sprout from tiny holes as water and nutrients flood the roots.

Mohamedou Ould Slahi, who was imprisoned by the United States in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for more than 14 years, was released on Monday, according to the Pentagon.

Imagine a stretch of water so dangerous even huge ships can’t cross it safely. A place sailors call the “graveyard,” where hundreds of boats have sunk and thousands of people have drowned.

Now imagine this place is crucial to the global economy, and like it or not, shipping vessels must enter it every day to keep things moving and avoid economic collapse.

Such a place exists in the Pacific Northwest. The Columbia River Bar, located at the intersection of the Columbia River and the Pacific Ocean, is considered one of the most dangerous stretches of water in the world.

The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurers from discriminating against people with serious illnesses, but some marketplace plans sidestep that taboo by making the drugs that people with HIV need unavailable or unaffordable, complaints filed recently with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Civil Rights allege.

Gov. Kate Brown is promising “sweeping change” from the new state air pollution rule-making process now underway.

UO Gets $500M Gift From Phil And Penny Knight

Oct 18, 2016

The University of Oregon has received $500 million dollar gift from Phil and Penny Knight to create a new campus-within-a-campus devoted to fast-track scientific discoveries.

The donation will cover half the cost of a new Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact in Eugene. President Michael Schill says the campus will help the university broaden its reach. Researchers and entrepreneurs will work in the same spaces, speeding the process of translating research discoveries into real-world products and services.

Stargazers, ready your telescopes: An unusual lunar event is going to be visible across large portions of the U.S.

It's called an "occultation," in which the waning gibbous moon will pass over the huge, bright orange star of Aldebaran. We thought the phenomenon's spooky name might be just the thing to get geared up for Halloween.

Advocates for a healthier Puget Sound have long contended that it needs to be treated as a nationally significant water body, just like the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay.

Such recognition, they say, will attract more money and attention for improving the Sound’s environmental health.

Fifty-two years after President Lyndon Johnson declared his “War on Poverty,” 20 percent of the country’s 74 million children live below the poverty line — many well below.

The recently released 2015 U.S. Census data show some improvement over 2014, but those gains don’t affect the children who live in the poorest households.

Emily Núñez Cavness was a student at Middlebury College — and the only member of the campus ROTC — when she formed the idea for the company she started with her sister, called Sword & Plough.

Now an active military officer and CEO, Cavness works to reuse military surplus to create bags and other accessories. Veterans are a big part of the process, from design to sales to the models on the company’s website.