Amanda Butt

Reporter

Amanda is a volunteer reporter at KLCC. She is a student at the University of Oregon where she studies Journalism and French. She hopes to one day use these two degrees as an international correspondent
broadcaster for radio or television.

At the University of Oregon, Amanda is specializing in broadcast journalism and is developing her multimedia and documentary skills as well. She enjoys telling stories with both video and audio. She is a producer for Duck TV News, the student-run, weekly news production on campus. She has also reported for Oregon News and interned as a reporter for KECI 13, an NBC news affiliate in Missoula, Montana. This summer Amanda worked with faculty and students at the U of O to produce a show called Northwest Stories for OPB.

In her free time, Amanda enjoys hiking, skiing, reading, and playing soccer.

Ways To Connect

Amanda Butt

Living on the street is difficult for anyone to do, but surviving without walls presents even greater dangers to women.

On a Saturday morning, a church in Corvallis fills slowly with people looking to fill their stomachs with warm breakfast food. Within the crowd is Marge Pettitt, a homeless activist in the community. She is friendly and repeatedly stops eating to give hugs to people she knows. But when she’s on the street, she’s cautious whenever she comes across strangers.

Coos Bay Rail Link

U.S. Senators Ron Wyden of Oregon and Mike Crapo from Idaho introduced the Short Line Railroad Rehabilitation and Investment Act of 2015 on Tuesday.

The senators' proposed act would extend the maintenance tax credit for short line railroads nationally which expired in 2014. When the previous bill was enacted, short line railroads across the country received a 50 percent tax credit, or, up to $3,500 per mile of track owned.

Now that these funds are expired, railroad owners will have less money to pay for maintenance. Martin Callery from the Port of Coos Bay explains:

Crater Lake is experiencing record low snow levels for this time of year.  Sunday it was at 37 inches. That's about a third of what the average depth is for this date. Marsha McCabe works for the park. She explains where she notices the lack of snow the most:

"It's pretty unusual because you can actually see out of the windows on the first floor of the buildings. Which, normally this time of year, they would be buried."

Mary DeMocker

Eugene resident Mary DeMocker is creating a block-long interactive art installation protesting the proposed Pacific Connector pipeline.

DeMocker's homemade pipeline stretches across her neighbors' yards. It serves as a visual representation of eminent domain, which Pacific Connector might use to claim the land it needs to transport natural gas. DeMocker describes her mock project:

"What we've done is basically condemned all of the neighbors' houses, as will be done if this natural gas pipeline is allowed to go through between Malin and Coos Bay Oregon."

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) is looking to acquire 10,000 acres of land on the Lower Deschutes River Canyon.

ODFW's purchase of this massive plot of land would add to the existing eight thousand acre Lower Deschutes Wildlife Area. The plot encompasses most of the Oak Creek Watershed.

ODFW wildlife biologist Jeremy Thompson explains why this is appealing:

The Jefferson Westside Neighbors will hold a panel discussion during their monthly meeting Tuesday evening. Neighborhood residents plan to meet with representatives from Capstone – the business responsible for the new 13th and Olive apartments in Eugene.

Some residents in the downtown area are not pleased with the tenants and management of the new 1,300 bedroom complex.

Tom Happy is on the Jefferson Westside Neighborhood board. He shares some concerns:

Heavy rains pounded the Oregon coast Monday Several schools and businesses lost power including the Adobe Inn in Yachats.

General Manager Anthony Muirhead says the lasting damage is to the front door. The strong winds blew it completely off its hinges.

“It was about seven o’clock this morning and certainly got our attention quickly. I think for our guests, it was just an impressive scene for what nature can do here on the coast.”

UPDATE: Lane County Health officials said Wednesday a third person has been hospitalized with a potential case of Meningococcemia.

Lane County health officials are looking for connections between the recent diagnosis of Meningococcemia– a blood infection that causes meningitis - and the case diagnosed last month. Both women with the diagnosis are University of Oregon Students.

An epidemiological team will collect samples from the two women and send them to the state lab where they will be compared. The results will be released in a few days.

Amanda Butt

Over 200 food producers and buyers gathered at Lane Community College for the annual Local Food Connection Conference Monday.

The Center for Meeting and Learning was buzzing with people talking about local food. Those in attendance were eager to put their products on shelves or to find someone growing a needed ingredient.

Many had attended in years past and say they keep coming back for the same reason, to network.

David Clark owns Cousin Jack’s Pasty Company in Eugene:

Tuesday evening state education leaders visited Eugene to hear thoughts from parents and teachers on the new Smarter Balanced standardized tests.

Tensions were high at North Eugene High School as many teachers from around the region spoke out against using the Common Core state testing standards in their classrooms.

The Smarter Balanced tests are conducted on computers. This is one concern of Looking Glass Riverfront School teacher Laura Farrelly.

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