Angela Kellner

All Things Considered Host/Reporter

Angela Kellner is the KLCC host of All Things Considered and a reporter. Angela began as a KLCC volunteer in 1991 when she was in high school. While a student at Lane Community College, she was hired in 1993 for a work-study position in the KLCC Music Department and has been with the station in some role since then. Angela hosted KLCC's world music program Tropical Beat  for 11 years from 1994 to 2005.

Angela graduated from the University of Oregon in 2001 with honors and received a B.A. in Journalism and Communication Studies. She has earned numerous awards for her reporting, including First Place from PRNDI for her 2008 story Neighborhood Impact of Regional Medical Center. The Associated Press awarded Angela First Place for her 2009 story on the Achievement Gap in Oregon Schools as well as First Place for her 2010 feature Oregon Veterans: Help Wanted. In 2010, she partnered with NPR and was included in their series Living With War at Home.

Angela is the proud mother of a daughter and son.

Ways to Connect

The nice fall weather might inspire more people to take part in the first-ever "Oregon Drive Less Challenge."

The 12-day challenge kicks off October 21st. The goal is to reduce vehicle miles traveled by a half-million. This will help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and burn calories, says organizer Kelly Bantle.

Bantle: "May not work for everyone's schedule all the time, but even just taking your bike down the street to the store, can really save on money on the road and also help trim our waistlines."

Timber companies filed a lawsuit Monday against the federal government. They claim there is no legal reason to suspend logging during the partial government shutdown.

The American Forest Resource Council joined Murphy Timber Company, High Cascades Inc., and South Bay Timber in the lawsuit. It seeks an injunction to lift the ban on logging during the government shutdown. AFRC Spokeswoman Ann Forest Burns says there is no provision in the contracts that says logging must be stopped on projects already approved. She says the lack of timber will hurt workers and mills.

The Springfield City Council voted unanimously to expand the car camping program for the homeless. It is modeled after one in Eugene. Churches and businesses have been allowed to have one car or motor home on site but can now have three. Niel Laudati is the city’s spokesman.

Laudati: “The city provides a portable toilet and we do some trash service. It’s very inexpensive for us. But it gives people a chance to rest in a safer place and it’s worked out so well.”

Oregon State Police volunteers are patrolling the neighborhoods around public schools in Lincoln County.

The OSP volunteers have been active in Lincoln County for more than 25 years. This is the first time they’ve specifically worked on school safety. They approached the school district after the Sandy Hook shooting in Connecticut. Sue Graves is the Safety Coordinator for Lincoln County Schools. She says the volunteers go through background checks and training with OSP. They are not police officers and are unarmed.

EWEB Approves Voluntary Smart Meters

Oct 2, 2013

After a crowded public hearing, the Eugene Water and Electric Board voted to install smart meters only for customers who request it. A number of people spoke in opposition to the wireless meters citing health concerns. EWEB spokesman Joe Harwood says there is no risk.

Harwood: “I’m frankly speechless. I don’t know how to respond to people that think that radio waves are going to somehow cause a health effect. It’s patently ridiculous.”

Project Homeless Connect

More than 200 people are expected to show up at the Project Homeless Connect in Newport this Friday.

It can be difficult for homeless people to get around the community to access services. Project Homeless Connect brings providers under one roof. Haircuts, dental care, clothing and help signing up for health care or benefits are a few of the offerings.

Angela Kellner

Nature has the power to destroy and to heal. Eight years ago Hurricane Katrina ravaged the Gulf Coast, hitting New Orleans especially hard. One family made the difficult choice to flee their place of birth for a new life in Oregon.

The eldest daughter has had a difficult time adjusting and finding her way. This summer she and her younger sister enrolled in a five-week job training program in the woods with Northwest Youth Corps.

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