Brian Bull

Reporter / Announcer

Brian Bull joined the KLCC News Team in June 2016.   Over his 21 years in public broadcasting, he's worked at NPR, Twin Cities Public Television, South Dakota Public Broadcasting, Wisconsin Public Radio, and ideastream in Cleveland. His reporting has netted dozens of accolades, including three national Edward R. Murrow Awards,  the Ohio Associated Press' Best Reporter Award in 2012, and most recently the PRNDI/NEFE Award for Excellence in Consumer Finance Reporting.

An enrolled member of the Nez Perce Tribe, Bull has worked with NPR's NextGeneration project geared towards diversifying the ranks of tomorrow's journalists, and has been a guest faculty at the Poynter Institute on covering underrepresented communities.

He's glad to be home in the Pacific Northwest, close to his family, tribe, and the Oregon Coast. He's married and has three children, and three cats. He enjoys photography, hiking, cooking, the visual and performing arts, and the occasional Godzilla movie.

Read how Brian's desire to spur reflection led him to a career in public media.

Brian has worked through the years with NPR on its Next Generation Radio Project, which trains journalists from underrepresented communities to become tomorrow's reporters.  Check out his latest project with Capital Public Radio in Sacramento here: http://capradio2017.nextgenerationradio.org/

Ways to Connect

Brian Bull

The towering creature of legend, Bigfoot, is near impossible to spot.  That hasn’t hurt its popularity, though.  While early exposure included plaster foot-casts and grainy film footage, Bigfoot today is on TV, countless books and websites, and even has an action figure.

KLCC’s Brian Bull measures the creature’s cultural footprint. 

Flickr.com's Smithsonian Institution.

Today, while many other American communities are observing Columbus Day, Eugene is joining several other Pacific Northwest cities in recognizing the second Monday of October as “Indigenous Peoples Day”.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports. 

Brian Bull

An initiative to help low-level offenders in Eugene get help instead of jail time is celebrating its first month, and graduate.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports. 

Flickr.com's Del Scorcho

The rate of DUI arrests for drugs has shot up considerably in Eugene, according to police.  And as KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the rate involving drugs and alcohol is even higher.

Brian Bull

It’s an increasingly familiar story…small craft brewery draws fans, expands, and then…gets scooped up by “Big Beer”.

Flickr.com's Wolfram Burner

The incoming class of Ducks is the most diverse in the University of Oregon’s history, officials say.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the returns follow several years of effort.

Brian Bull

After nearly forty years, a Eugene gun shop is closing.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the owner says competing online sales are partly behind the decision.  

Brian Bull

Eugene’s newest middle school was made official today, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, Roosevelt Middle School boasts a variety of eco-friendly features.

Brian Bull

Clean-up continues at the site of Sunday night’s train derailment.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, rail authorities are still trying to determine the cause.

Oregon state police are renewing their call for tips surrounding the toppling of a large sandstone pedestal in Cape Kiwanda this summer.

Brian Bull

Trucks, boxes, totes -- and sweat -- marked the “Unpack the Quack” event at the University of Oregon.  Roughly 3,000 students and their families clustered on campus today to move in.  KLCC's Brian Bull reports.  

Flickr.com's Pete.

Oregon election officials say they’re getting complaints from voters over a letter informing them of their registration status.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.  

By Flickr.com's C_osett.

Users of the home sharing site Airbnb will now not only be finding a place to stay for the night, they’ll also be adding to the City of Eugene’s tax coffers.  KLCC’s Brian Bull explains.

Brian Bull

The rate of reported hate crimes for the city of Eugene seems to be holding steady since tracking began four years ago.  KLCC’s Brian Bull attended the release of the “2015 Hate and Bias Report” at the historic Mims house today and has this story. 

Brian Bull

Activists against the Dakota Access oil pipeline development in the Midwest held an international “Day of Action” today.  Among the dozen protest sites in the Pacific Northwest, was Cottage Grove.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

From Brett Rowlett, Lane Community College.

More than a year after Governor Kate Brown signed it into effect, the state’s 17 community colleges are welcoming their first class of Oregon Promise through their doors.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Archaelogical Legacy Institute.

A Eugene-based organization wants to help solve one of history’s greatest mysteries: the fate of pioneer aviatrix Amelia Earhart, whose plane disappeared nearly 80 years ago.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.


Jolleen Brown, Lakota Tribal Member

Saturday in Corvallis, there will be a rally to show support for Native Americans protesting an oil pipeline project in the upper Midwest.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Oregon Parks & Recreation.

Oregon State Police are taking the lead on a case where a sandstone rock formation was pushed over by tourists.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

  

Thomas Shahan, Flickr.com (top) and Chelsea Rutherford, KATU News (bottom)

The toppling and destruction of a sandstone formation at a state park site in Tillamook County is now being investigated as a possible case of vandalism.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports:

Bethel School District

An official with Bethel School District in Eugene says recent lead testing has proven the majority of its water sources are safe, and schools will open come September.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept.

What’s being called a significant archeological discovery has been found in Oregon’s Willamette Valley.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports ancient obsidian objects are linked to early Native American activity in the region.

Brian Bull

The phrase, “back to school” spurs many families to grab school supplies.  Some may reuse stuff from previous years - such as an old backpack or calculator - in order to save some money. 

School districts cut costs and practice sustainability by reusing materials and equipment gleaned from freshly-demolished schools.  KLCC’s Brian Bull has the story.

Brian Bull

A review of over 20,000 groundwater sites by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows half of the nation’s states have high --to very high-- potential to become corrosive.  As KLCC's Brian Bull reports, this includes Oregon and Washington.

AANR

This week, hundreds of people will gather near Eugene and bare all for a national nudist convention.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, there are serious public policy issues amidst the fun and frolic.

Dave Howe, Bend Fire Dept.

Fire officials say 10 small brush fires set along a Bend area road this morning were caused by a faulty car part.

Don Hann, USDA Forest Service

Earlier this year, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names determined that 13 sites in Oregon’s Grant County would drop the word “squaw”.   This aligns with a 2001 state law banning the word for public areas.  Now as KLCC’s Brian Bull in Eugene reports, a county official hopes the federal government will allow two place names to be used over those proposed by local Indian tribes. 

Brian Bull

The Oregon Country Fair is a chance to relax and “let it all hang out,” so to speak.  But while most people are fine with the standard summer attire of shorts and a t-shirt, or a billowy dress with wide-brimmed hat, others are more comfortable with skimpy garments or even just a layer of paint.  KLCC’s Brian Bull visited with a young couple who mostly went au naturel to this annual event.

Brian Bull

A new art installation is complete and slated to debut soon at the Oregon Country Fair. But as KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the “Story Pole” is still a year away from being erected.

Brian Bull

The sounds of the Oregon Country Fair are mostly invigorating.  There’s music to get your feet moving, spoken words to stir your soul, and vaudevillian comedy to jar your funny bone.  But one musician provides a special experience for those who want to be transported away from the revelry, if even for just a few minutes. 

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