Brian Bull

Reporter / Announcer

Brian Bull joined the KLCC News Team in June 2016.   Over his 21 years in public broadcasting, he's worked at NPR, Twin Cities Public Television, South Dakota Public Broadcasting, Wisconsin Public Radio, and ideastream in Cleveland. His reporting has netted dozens of accolades, including three national Edward R. Murrow Awards,  the Ohio Associated Press' Best Reporter Award in 2012, and most recently the PRNDI/NEFE Award for Excellence in Consumer Finance Reporting.

An enrolled member of the Nez Perce Tribe, Bull has worked with NPR's NextGeneration project geared towards diversifying the ranks of tomorrow's journalists, and has been a guest faculty at the Poynter Institute on covering underrepresented communities.

He's glad to be home in the Pacific Northwest, close to his family, tribe, and the Oregon Coast. He's married and has three children, and three cats. He enjoys photography, hiking, cooking, the visual and performing arts, and the occasional Godzilla movie.

Read how Brian's desire to spur reflection led him to a career in public media.

Brian has worked through the years with NPR on its Next Generation Radio Project, which trains journalists from underrepresented communities to become tomorrow's reporters.  Check out his latest project with Capital Public Radio in Sacramento here: http://capradio2017.nextgenerationradio.org/

Ways to Connect

Dave Howe, Bend Fire Dept.

Fire officials say 10 small brush fires set along a Bend area road this morning were caused by a faulty car part.

Don Hann, USDA Forest Service

Earlier this year, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names determined that 13 sites in Oregon’s Grant County would drop the word “squaw”.   This aligns with a 2001 state law banning the word for public areas.  Now as KLCC’s Brian Bull in Eugene reports, a county official hopes the federal government will allow two place names to be used over those proposed by local Indian tribes. 

Brian Bull

The Oregon Country Fair is a chance to relax and “let it all hang out,” so to speak.  But while most people are fine with the standard summer attire of shorts and a t-shirt, or a billowy dress with wide-brimmed hat, others are more comfortable with skimpy garments or even just a layer of paint.  KLCC’s Brian Bull visited with a young couple who mostly went au naturel to this annual event.

Brian Bull

A new art installation is complete and slated to debut soon at the Oregon Country Fair. But as KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the “Story Pole” is still a year away from being erected.

Brian Bull

The sounds of the Oregon Country Fair are mostly invigorating.  There’s music to get your feet moving, spoken words to stir your soul, and vaudevillian comedy to jar your funny bone.  But one musician provides a special experience for those who want to be transported away from the revelry, if even for just a few minutes. 

Prep Underway For OCF

Jul 8, 2016
Brian Bull

The 47th annual Oregon Country Fair certainly isn’t shy of pageantry and spectacle.  But getting the 280-acres prepped and ready for the crush of crowds this weekend doesn’t happen on its own. KLCC’s Brian Bull visited the fairgrounds while crews and vendors set up, and learned right off that preparation is all a matter of scale…literally.

Kira Hoffelmeyer

This weekend the Oregon Country Fair marks its 47th year, a near-half century of music, body paint, and environmentally-friendly counterculture.  Roughly 50,000 people are expected to show during the three-day event, west of Eugene.  KLCC’s Brian Bull visited with a longtime coordinator of the fair, who’s just taken on a new role.

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