David Dye

David Dye is a longtime Philadelphia radio personality whose music enthusiasm has captivated listeners of World Cafe® since 1991. World Cafeis produced by WXPN, the public radio service of the University of Pennsylvania.

Dye launched his distinguished broadcasting career as host of a progressive music show on WMMR 93.3 FM, a pioneering progressive rock station in Philadelphia. During his four-year tenure, Dye won accolades for his taste and laid back presentation. After a five-year stint programming radio stations in Maine, he returned to Philadelphia where he gained public radio experience at WHYY before being recruited in 1981 by alternative rock station WIOQ 102.1 FM where he made his mark on the music scene for nearly a decade.

In 1989, Dye took his musical quest to WXPN where he hosted the station's Sleepy Hollow radio program. Two years later, Dye was asked to spearhead research on the viability of a new public radio program. The research revealed an audience need for a new kind of musical format - one that was intelligent, diverse and would give musical guests a showcase for their artistic expression. Based on the findings, Dye went to work to create a unique program of musical discovery where listeners would be introduced to an eclectic blend of contemporary sounds from legendary and up-and-coming artists. World Cafewas born.

Since launching World Cafein 1991, Dye has served as the host of this nationally acclaimed show, now syndicated on more than 250 public radio stations across the United States. Every week, Dye brings out the best in interviews with internationally known artists such as Yo-Yo Ma and Joni Mitchell. He has conducted nearly 4,500 interviews during his 20 years with the program. He introduces a half-million listeners each week to newcomers like Vampire Weekend, Mumford & Sons, PJ Harvey, Sheryl Crow, Beck, LCD Soundsystem and Amos Lee.

World Cafe and Dye have received numerous awards including: two NFCB Gold Reel Awards, Album Network's "Best Triple A Air Talent," five Philadelphia Magazine's "Best of Philly Awards," the Philadelphia Chapter of NARAS "Hero Award," the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award and numerous radio industry trade magazine citations. In 2006, Dye was named the "Triple A Air Personality of the Year" by Radio & Records.

Jesca Hoop On World Cafe

6 hours ago

Rarely have we heard a more cogent description of the creative process of a true artist than from singer-songwriter Jesca Hoop. "A great artist is not someone who is fully confident, but someone who carries self doubt," she says. "And it's that doubt that carries you into your stronger ideas."

Timothy Showalter is the band called Strand of Oaks. Originally from Indiana, Showalter now lives in Philadelphia, where he's reimagined himself as a rocker after releasing a couple of quieter albums. This latest phase of his career started with his well-received 2014 album Heal; he recently released the follow-up, Hard Love.

The 1970s was an incredibly diverse decade for recorded music: from hippie folk at the start to disco, punk, the rise of reggae and the very first stirrings of hip-hop. At the beginning of the decade, Frank Sinatra had a song on the charts for 122 weeks. There was soft rock, metal and country. Album sales and progressive radio were huge.

All this is true. That's why it is so fascinating to look at the songs that ended up at the very top of Billboard's pop chart for each year of the decade — they certainly don't always represent all the change that was going on.

What's the best way to become the unchallenged expert on a particular genre of music? Invent it. Enter JD Ryznar, Hunter Stair, David B. Lyons and Steve Huey: coiners of the description "yacht rock," creators of a hilarious web series of the same name and now de facto captains of the genre.

The 1970s may be the baby-boomer generation's musical sweet spot, at least according to the principle that you'll always love the music you first heard when you were 17. But there is also a pretty good argument that a lot of musical innovation and stylistic coming-of-age happened in those 10 years.

That's why World Cafe has put together our first "That '70s Week." All the music we'll play on air this week comes from that golden decade, and we've dug into the archives for these sessions with artists whose work in the '70s still stands out.

Valerie June releases her new album, The Order Of Time, Friday. It's the follow-up to her 2013 breakout album, Pushin' Against A Stone, which was produced by Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys. June was influenced by the church, family members and the music of Memphis, where she grew up and first began performing.

Guitarist Harvey Mandel was on the very short list to replace Mick Taylor in The Rolling Stones, but you've probably never heard of him — or even heard him play. Mandel grew up playing in Chicago blues clubs in the early '60s and made a breakthrough record with Charlie Musselwhite called Stand Back! Here Comes Charley Musselwhite's South Side Band.

Music was a solace for Chris Robinson long before he and his brother Rich formed The Black Crowes. "Being a little weirdo, outsider, dyslexic kid from the Deep South in the early '70s, to me music and art was an oasis away from everybody," he says. When the brothers dissolved their longtime band for good a few years ago, Chris formed the Chris Robinson Brotherhood with guitarist Neal Casal and others.

Cameron Avery may have a day job as the bassist in Tame Impala, but bandmate Kevin Parker, kept encouraging him to make his own album. After relocating from Perth to Los Angeles, he made Ripe Dreams, Pipe Dreams, an album of romantic songs that's influenced by older favorites like Johnny Hartman and Sarah Vaughan but also nods to Nick Cave and Scott Walker. Producer Jonathan Wilson inspired Avery to explore his baritone voice more, and a sound combining new and old was born.

Jain On World Cafe

Mar 6, 2017

Jain's debut album, Zanaka, is an irresistible, eclectic pop record with a freshness to its songs. At 25 years old, the French singer has traveled and lived all over the world, including childhood stints in Dubai, Abu Dhabi and the Republic of the Congo. Along the way, she discovered African percussion and rhythms, which permeate the tracks on her new album and in this one-woman performance. Watch it in the video below and stream the complete session in the player above.

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