Eric Alan

Music, Arts & Culture Host

Eric Alan is KLCC’s music, arts and culture host. The interviews and performances he hosts air on KLCC as local inserts during programs including The Takeaway, Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and The World . Previously, he spent seventeen years at Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, where he was music director and host of the daily music show Open Air. He is a nationally published author and photographer with three books to his credit, ranging from nature spirituality to major league baseball. He also works with National Geographic photographer Dewitt Jones, regularly contributing words and photographs to the project “Celebrate What’s Right with the World.” He is an accomplished lyricist as well, with credits ranging from international recording artists Gypsy Soul to the Oregon Cabaret Theatre. He has served on the board of the Lane County Cultural Coalition, and is a founding board member of Cerro Gordo Land Conservancy. 

Ways to Connect

Photo by Ronald Perez

The beauty of nature, music and photography will converge in The Four Seasons of the McKenzie River, presented by the Eugene Symphony in association with McKenzie River Trust and Travel Lane County.

Photo by Eric Alan

Turntablist and scratch DJ Connah Jay has sampled, mixed and created new sounds from vinyl records for over 15 years in Eugene. He’s a founding member of Bohemian Dub Orchestra and Medium Troy, as well as a solo DJ. He speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan about his unique craft, before being DJ at the KLCC Brew Fest at the Lane Events Center, on Friday February 9th and Saturday February 10th.

The podcast S-town brought new audio storytelling forms into being, drawing from literature and investigative journalism. It followed the true story of John B. McLemore, who hated his hometown of Woodstock, Alabama enough to bring it to the attention of the producers of This American Life. Brian Reed went off on the storytelling trail to investigate a murder that may not have happened, but encountered many strange things that did happen. S-Town was then downloaded 40 million times in the first month after it was released.

Classical chamber music and Chicago blues harmonica merge in Corky Siegel’s Chamber Blues, on their new release Different Voices. Corky Siegel speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan about that musical symbiosis, about music as a manifestation of inner deepening, and fearlessness as a compositional tool.

In 2012, author Ursula K. LeGuin spoke at the Downtown Eugene Public Library, in conjunction with the annual Big Read--an even in which the whole community is asked to read and discuss one book, and its issues. In this case, the book was Ray Bradbury's classic Farhenheit 451, with all of its issues regarding censorship, self-censorship and the power of reading. KLCC's Eric Alan spoke to Ursula K. LeGuin then about those issues, as well as the impact of the Internet on reading, and her own work. To honor her passing, we revisit that interview here. 

David Grisman has led evolving versions of his Quintet for over forty years, since the self-titled David Grisman Quintet album revolutionized the acoustic music world in 1977 with its merger of bluegrass, jazz and beyond.

Photo by Eric Alan

Ladysmith Black Mambazo has brought their joyful vocal music from South Africa to the world for over half a century, their music rising from isicathamiya, the music of the mines. In the past year, they’ve released two albums: Songs of Peace and Love for Kids and Parents Around the World Sharing, and also Shaka Zulu Revisited, both of which have received Grammy nominations—bringing the band to 19 Grammy nominations in their career. 

“American Identity in the Age of Trump” is the topic in Oregon Humanities Center’s next lecture in their “We the People” series. It will be given by journalist, novelist and playwright George Packer, whose latest book is The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America--a New York Times Bestseller and winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

Photo by Eric Alan

Stephanie Schneiderman and Tony Furtado have created diverse and skilled music, individually and together. Stephanie’s solo work first came to public attention via her place on the Lilith Fair tour, and through subsequent albums that have ranged from trip-hop to acoustic; she’s also been a key part of the bands Dirty Martini and Swan Sovereign. Tony Furtado is a master of slide guitar and banjo, with around fifteen albums out; he’s also played with Alison Krauss, Jerry Douglas and many others. Furthermore, he’s a fine sculptor.

The day after the Civil War ended in 1865, Passover began. The play The Whipping Man explores the parallels between the freeing of slaves in America, and the liberation of the Israelites in Egypt.

Nikola Tesla’s inventions and imaginations crossed boundaries from electricity to wireless communications, from prescient genius to misguided theories. The life he lived spanned an equally wide and tumultuous range.

Photo by Faith Kreskey

Lane County History Museum’s new exhibit is Toys! Historic Playthings from Lane County. It includes artifacts and photographs from 1850 to 1950, giving a reflection of Oregon life through the eyes of kids at play. Exhibit curator Faith Kreskey speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan about vintage toys and the evolving nature of play itself. 

Doug Carnine is a Professor Emeritus of Education at the University of Oregon, who is the founder of a project called Feed Kindness Starve Harm. In connection with that, he has published two books this year on the inner workings of mindful kindness. One is How Love Wins: The Power of Mindful Kindness, and the other is Saint Badass: Personal Transcendence in Tucker Max Hell, which arises out of correspondence with prisoners in a maximum security prison in Arkansas. He also will offer seminars on the subject through Sponsors, Inc. in Eugene.

Photo by Alexis Evers

An ensemble from the Oregon Mozart Players performed in KLCC's SELCO Performance Hall on Tuesday evening, December 12th, in front of a live studio audience.

Photo by Jen Bell

Oregon is unique among states, in having created a funding model for the arts, heritage and humanities through the Oregon Cultural Trust. Via tax credits, the trust supports statewide partners, tribal and county coalitions, and qualified cultural nonprofits.

Photo by Eric Alan

The Sixth Annual Caldera Songwriters benefit concert for the Egan Warming Center will be this evening, December 8th, at Tsunami Books in Eugene. All proceeds will benefit the warming center, which ensures that homeless people have shelter during extreme cold weather. Donations of clothing and toiletries will also be accepted. Three of the many songwriters performing this evening are here in the KLCC studios, including Anna Tivel, Jeffrey Martin and Beth Wood. 

Eugene native Robin Jackson and his seven-piece band the Caravan return to town to celebrate their new release Dark Stars with a show at Sam Bond’s Garage on December 16th. He speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan about the album’s intimate orchestral sound, and how it relates to the other projects in which he’s been central: Vagabond Opera, the Marchfourth Marching Band, the Joy Now Art Project for kids, and Portland’s Songwriter Soiree. 

They Call Me Q is a one-woman play written by Qurrat Ann Kadwani, telling her story as a person born in India but growing up in the Bronx, seeking an identity balancing heritage with a desire for acceptance in her new culture. She will give a free performance of it in the Blue Door Theater at Lane Community on Monday, November 27th, with discussion and international food to follow. 

Lane Community College has established an artist-in-residence program, which has brought two interdisciplinary artists to the campus from elsewhere this fall. One artist is Hong Hong, born in China, now residing in Hartford Connecticut. 

The Inner World of Aphasia is a 1967 film by Eugene filmmakers Edward and Naomi Feil, which explores the inability to speak due to a brain injury. It tells the story in a way which uniquely combines the techniques of art films and medical education films. As part of the Schnitzer Cinema series, it will be screened at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene on Wednesday, November 15th at 7 p.m. Ken Feil is the son of the filmmakers, and senior scholar in residence in the Department of Media and Visual Arts at Emerson College.

Photo by Rob Sydor

Mirror-touch synesthesia is a rare neurological trait causing an unusual crossing of senses. Amy van der Linde, piano teacher and parenting educator, speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan about how she has applied her experience with synesthesia to explore the nature of happiness. She’ll give a talk called Happy Brain, Happy Being at the Downtown Eugene Public Library on Thursday, November 16th.

Down Range is an exhibit of art by thirteen veterans, on display now through December 23rd at the Umpqua Valley Arts Association’s Art Center in Roseburg—a building which opened a century ago as the Roseburg Soldiers Hospital.

Ari Shapiro is known to KLCC listeners as a host of NPR’s All Things Considered, and as a reporter who has filed compelling stories from across the globe.

Photo by Eric Alan

The stories of Lane County immigrants are told in the play Now I Am Your Neighbor, performed next at Oregon Contemporary Theater on Tuesday, November 7th. Among the stories told in the play is that of Rosie Hernandez, who arrived in Lane County from Mexico in 1987. She and playwright Nancy Hopps talk about the play and its meanings with KLCC’s Eric Alan.

Photo by Eric Alan

This fall, over thirty pianists in nine countries will participate in Climate Keys, a project pairing concerts and climate change talks. Locally, pianist Alexander Schwarzkopf will pair with geologist Gregory Retallack, on November 8th at First United Methodist in Eugene, in a benefit for 350 Eugene. KLCC’s Eric Alan speaks with Alexander Schwarzkopf and Deb McGhee, co-founder of 350 Eugene.

Photo by Beau Baumann

Ursula K. LeGuin’s classic 1969 science fiction novel The Left Hand of Darkness explores themes of a world beyond gender, as well as issues of loyalty and betrayal. In the past five years, she has worked with theatre director John B. Schmor, to collaboratively produce an evolving stage version. 

Photo by Eric Alan

Saxophonist Idit Shner has made her mark in both the jazz and classical worlds, and finds inspiration from literature in the form of her new release 9 Short Stories, upon which she’s joined by a Texas jazz trio. Idit Shner will perform twice in Eugene, first as part of the Broadway House Concerts series on October 28th, honoring Duke Ellington’s saxophonist Johnny Hodges, and in a CD release show at the Jazz Station on November 4th. 

The first annual Northwest Different Arts and Music Showcase (NODAMS) celebrates experimental sounds and music, inspired in part by a parallel festival in Olympia Washington, and by the Dada and surrealist movements of a century ago.

The Sprout Film Festival presents films realistically portraying the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Locally, the 10th annual festival is presented by Full Access, which provides services and support to people with those disabilities. It will screen at Lane Community College’s main campus and Cottage Grove campus on Thursday, October 19th, at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art on Friday, October 20th, and at the Broadway Metro Theater on Saturday, October 21st.  April Wick, Executive Director of Full Access, speaks with KLCC's Eric Alan. 

Mac McAnally has been named the Country Music Association’s Musician of the Year for eight consecutive years. Besides writing hits for many country stars and performing as part of Jimmy Buffett’s Coral Reefer Band, he’s released sixteen albums of his own. The latest one is Southbound, which puts his songs in an orchestral context.

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