Eric Alan

Music, Arts & Culture Host

Eric Alan is KLCC’s music, arts and culture host. The music performances he hosts on KLCC air during Q; his interviews and features air during The Takeaway, The World and other programs. Previously, he spent seventeen years at Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, where he was music director and host of the daily music show Open Air. He is a nationally published author and photographer with three books to his credit, ranging from nature spirituality to major league baseball. He also works with National Geographic photographer Dewitt Jones, regularly contributing words and photographs to the project “Celebrate What’s Right with the World.” He is an accomplished lyricist as well, with credits ranging from international recording artists Gypsy Soul to the Oregon Cabaret Theatre.

Ways to Connect

  The 13th annual Archaeology Channel Film and Video Festival tells a visual human story, May 9th through 15th in Eugene, in a vastly expanded festival that also includes a Conference on Cultural Heritage Media, and a variety of other events. Director Rick Pettigrew speaks with Eric Alan about the Antikythera Mechanism, a two-thousand-year-old Greek computer featured in the film The X-Ray Time Machine. He also talks about the unique cultural exchange between Iran and Eugene, and the challenges of overcoming visa issues for foreign filmmakers.     

  Reverend Billy of the Church of Stop Shopping turns his attention to climate change in his new book and CD, The Earth Wants YOU! He speaks with Eric Alan about weather as a form of communication, about launching a revolution by singing in big box stores, and why it’s worth getting arrested seventy times (so far). Reverend Billy gives a book reading at Kalapuya Books/Axe and Fiddle in Cottage Grove on Friday, April 29th.  

  A Woman’s Guide to the Wild is the first outdoor guidebook specifically addressing women’s unique wilderness needs. Author Ruby McConnell speaks with Eric Alan about correcting the perceived outdoor gender gap, particularly when women have long been leaders in the environmental movement. 

  The Thin Green Line is a conference that will gather activists, artists, writers, scientists, policy makers and others to explore creative resistance to fossil fuel development in the Pacific Northwest.

  A multi-faceted celebration takes place at the WOW Hall in Eugene tonight, April 20th, as David Gans, the Garcia Birthday Band, various Merry Pranksters and others gather to celebrate Oregon’s first legal 4/20, and whatever else feels worth celebrating. David Gans has been a part of related celebrations for decades, as a musician, author, storyteller, and proprietor of the nationally-syndicated Grateful Dead Hour.

  Digital and traditional artists will explore the theme of ritual in the fifth annual (sub)Urban Projections festival, presented by City of Eugene Cultural Services and Harmonic Laboratory at the Hult Center in Eugene on April 21st and 22nd. John Park, animator and digital artist for Harmonic Laboratory, and Isaac Marquez, Public Art Manager for the City of Eugene, speak with Eric Alan about creating new possibilities and turning the seven-level lobby into a performance space integrating artists and audience. 

Photo by Thomas J. King

  The inevitable changes of aging are celebrated in Menopause: the Musical. Actress Megan Cavanagh speaks with Eric Alan about embracing the changes, laughing at them and singing about them. The national touring show visits the Hult Center in Eugene on April 22nd through 24th. 

  Comparatively few people of color visit the American wilderness, though the resources are public to all. African-American outdoorsman James Mills addresses this disparity in his book The Adventure Gap: Changing the Face of the Outdoors. He speaks with Eric Alan about the issues and how to address them, before his illustrated talk at the Downtown Eugene Public Library on Saturday, April 23rd.

  “Innovation District” is the theme of the next event in the TAD Talks series, which examines the role of technology and the arts in Downtown Eugene. There will be several speakers, as well as exhibitions, performances and a beer tasting, at the McDonald Theatre on Tuesday evening, April 19th.

Music and history combine in unique ways as Swedish violinist Semmy Stahlhammer and his wife, cellist Isabel Blomme, visit the Willamette Valley. They’ll perform with Chamber Music Amici in Springfield on April 17th and 18th, in a program that ranges from Tchaikovsky to Klezmer. Semmy Stahlhammer will also appear at Temple Beth Israel on Wednesday, April 13th, to speak about his book Codename Barber, which details the story of his father Mischa, a Polish Jew who was a landmine specialist in the People’s Army in World War II.

Pages