Eric Alan

Music, Arts & Culture Host

Eric Alan is KLCC’s music, arts and culture host. The music performances he hosts on KLCC air during Q; his interviews and features air during The Takeaway, The World and other programs. Previously, he spent seventeen years at Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, where he was music director and host of the daily music show Open Air. He is a nationally published author and photographer with three books to his credit, ranging from nature spirituality to major league baseball. He also works with National Geographic photographer Dewitt Jones, regularly contributing words and photographs to the project “Celebrate What’s Right with the World.” He is an accomplished lyricist as well, with credits ranging from international recording artists Gypsy Soul to the Oregon Cabaret Theatre.

Ways to Connect

Photo by Eric Alan

The band Las Cafeteras blends elements of traditional Son Jarocho Afro-Mexican folk music with the roots of East Los Angeles streets, in a socially conscious and highly danceable way. They’ve just released a new album called Tastes Like L.A., Before performing at the WOW Hall in Eugene on Thursday, April 20th, they came by the KLCC studios for songs and celebration, in a set hosted by Eric Alan. 

Ira Glass has been a master storyteller for over twenty years, as host and creator of This American Life. In an in-depth interview with KLCC’s Eric Alan, he shares his thoughts on what makes for a compelling story, including examples ranging from the power of unstoppable delusions to what it’s like to discover that your mother is secretly running guns into Africa.

Eleanor Roosevelt: Across a Barrier of Fear is a one-woman play by Sharon Whitney, featuring Jane VanBoskirk.

Author Garth Stein has inspired millions with his book, The Art of Racing in the Rain, about a dog obsessed with car racing and believing he’ll be reincarnated in human form. The book is the focus of this year’s Newport Reads program. Garth Stein will appear at the Newport Performing Arts Center on April 19th, and at the Downtown Eugene Public Library on April 22nd. He speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan. 

My Last Continent is a novel by Midge Raymond—a love story stretching from Antarctica to Eugene, where the book’s protagonist Deb Gardner lives and teaches.

Photo courtesy of Eugene Register-Guard

The late Jon Sutton was a renowned Eugene composer and musician, whose creative talents extended into tapestries, silk-screen printing, oil and watercolor—even furniture design and photography of the Korean War. His legacy is being celebrated with a concert on April 7th by Eugene Vocal Arts and Eugene Concert

Eugene Ballet will present the world premiere of their original ballet of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Snow Queen on April 8th and 9th at the Hult Center.

Author Henry Alley’s new book is The Dahlia Field, which collects fourteen short stories exploring the complex and nuanced lives of gay male characters. 

The Slants, an Asian-American band from Portland, were blocked from trademarking their name because it was deemed racially disparaging. The case reached the US Supreme Court in January, and awaits resolution. The Slants are touring behind their new EP, The Band Who Must Not Be Named, and will appear in Eugene at the Black Forest on Saturday, April 1st.

In conjunction with the exhibition Hungry Planet: What the World Eats, the UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History presents “Bowls Around Town: Eugene, OR” in which people can check out a handmade ceramic bowl from artist Michael J. Strand, along with a digital camera. 

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