Eric Alan

Music, Arts & Culture Host

Eric Alan is KLCC’s music, arts and culture host. The music performances he hosts on KLCC air during Q; his interviews and features air during The Takeaway, The World and other programs. Previously, he spent seventeen years at Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, where he was music director and host of the daily music show Open Air. He is a nationally published author and photographer with three books to his credit, ranging from nature spirituality to major league baseball. He also works with National Geographic photographer Dewitt Jones, regularly contributing words and photographs to the project “Celebrate What’s Right with the World.” He is an accomplished lyricist as well, with credits ranging from international recording artists Gypsy Soul to the Oregon Cabaret Theatre.

Ways to Connect

Photo by Eric Alan

  The Mims House became the first black-owned property in Eugene in 1948, after previous ordinances prohibited people of color from purchasing property or living within city limits. Eric Alan speaks with Willie Mims about the living history there, including visits from Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald.

    

  The troupe Che Malambo brings the rhythmic dance of Argentina’s 17th century gauchos into the present. Producer Matthew Bledsoe speaks with Eric Alan about the rhythms, the cultural heritage and compelling history of the dance. Che Malambo performs at the Hult Center on Thursday, May 26th. 

Photo by Eric Alan

  The Dema Ensemble is a new group that weaves drumming, dancing, singing and other forms of visual and physical storytelling from a variety of African cultures. 

Photo by Eric Alan

  Shawn James and the Shapeshifters are an Arkansas quintet whose music has crossed many boundaries of rock and folk, blues and soul.

Photo by Richard Avedon

  DJ Spooky, a.k.a. Dr. Paul D. Miller, speaks with Eric Alan about the world premiere of his composition “Heart of a Forest” in Corvallis on May 18th The piece is based on his residencies in the H.J. Andrews Experimental forest, and merges electronic music with the OSU Wind Ensemble. DJ Spooky is a multi-media artist, author and hip-hop turntablist whose credits include collaborations with Yoko Ono, Chuck D of Public Enemy, and a residency at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. 

  Roseburg’s free concert series, Music on the Half Shell, celebrates its 25th anniversary season in 2016. Kelly Leonard speaks with Eric Alan about a unique tradition of connection between audience and artists. He also shares music from a few of this year’s performers, including Luisa Maita (“loo-EE-suh MY-tuh”), Leroy Bell, James Hunter and Pink Martini. 

  Author and Eugene Register-Guard columnist Dorcas Smucker speaks with Eric Alan about the music of Amish, Mennonite and German traditions, and how modern technology affects those musical traditions in family life. Dorcas Smucker will appear on The Back Porch with Pete LaVelle on KLCC on Saturday evening, May 14th, to share many songs from those traditions. 

  Ben Saunders is curator of the exhibit “Aliens, Monsters and Madmen: the Art of EC Comics,” opening May 14th at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. He speaks with Eric Alan about the enduring impact of the artistically striking and politically radical comic art that EC produced in the 1940s and ‘50s, which ranged from horror to humor. Ben Saunders is also the director of the UO's Comic Studies minor. 

  #Instaballet offers a chance for the audience to choreograph a dance, which is immediately turned into a fully-formed performance. Co-founder Antonio Anacan speaks with Eric Alan about creating in real time with the audience, about dance as acceptance, and about photographing dance as well. #Instaballet performs a dance of acceptance at the Midtown Arts Center in Eugene on Friday, May 6th, as part of First Friday ArtWalk. Antonio Anacan's dance photography will also be on display. 

  Guy Sigsworth is a classical harpsichordist and electronic dance music producer who has collaborated with Madonna, Bjork and many others, and led his own duo Frou Frou to pop stardom. He speaks with Eric Alan about whether pop music is rubbish, finding the soul in electronic machines, and the basic vitality of choral music. He’s in residency at the UO School of Music and Dance this week.   

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