Eric Alan

Music, Arts & Culture Host

Eric Alan is KLCC’s music, arts and culture reporter. The interviews and performances he hosts air on KLCC as local inserts during programs including The Takeaway, Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and The World . Previously, he spent seventeen years at Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, where he was music director and host of the daily music show Open Air. He is a nationally published author and photographer with three books to his credit, ranging from nature spirituality to major league baseball. He also works with National Geographic photographer Dewitt Jones, regularly contributing words and photographs to the project “Celebrate What’s Right with the World.” He is an accomplished lyricist as well, with credits ranging from international recording artists Gypsy Soul to the Oregon Cabaret Theatre. He has served on the board of the Lane County Cultural Coalition, and is a founding board member of Cerro Gordo Land Conservancy. 

Ways to Connect

Eleanor Roosevelt: Across a Barrier of Fear is a one-woman play by Sharon Whitney, featuring Jane VanBoskirk.

Author Garth Stein has inspired millions with his book, The Art of Racing in the Rain, about a dog obsessed with car racing and believing he’ll be reincarnated in human form. The book is the focus of this year’s Newport Reads program. Garth Stein will appear at the Newport Performing Arts Center on April 19th, and at the Downtown Eugene Public Library on April 22nd. He speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan. 

My Last Continent is a novel by Midge Raymond—a love story stretching from Antarctica to Eugene, where the book’s protagonist Deb Gardner lives and teaches.

Photo courtesy of Eugene Register-Guard

The late Jon Sutton was a renowned Eugene composer and musician, whose creative talents extended into tapestries, silk-screen printing, oil and watercolor—even furniture design and photography of the Korean War. His legacy is being celebrated with a concert on April 7th by Eugene Vocal Arts and Eugene Concert

Eugene Ballet will present the world premiere of their original ballet of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Snow Queen on April 8th and 9th at the Hult Center.

Author Henry Alley’s new book is The Dahlia Field, which collects fourteen short stories exploring the complex and nuanced lives of gay male characters. 

The Slants, an Asian-American band from Portland, were blocked from trademarking their name because it was deemed racially disparaging. The case reached the US Supreme Court in January, and awaits resolution. The Slants are touring behind their new EP, The Band Who Must Not Be Named, and will appear in Eugene at the Black Forest on Saturday, April 1st.

In conjunction with the exhibition Hungry Planet: What the World Eats, the UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History presents “Bowls Around Town: Eugene, OR” in which people can check out a handmade ceramic bowl from artist Michael J. Strand, along with a digital camera. 

“Art Song” is a classical chamber music form setting poetry to music. Soprano Laura Wayte is founder of the art song performance series “Songs@Tsunami.” She speaks with KLCC’s Eric Alan, before a March 25th show focusing on music for, by and about women. It will feature vocalist Janene Nelson and pianist Yuliya Minina. 

Bestselling author Laurie Notaro’s new book is Crossing the Horizon. The historical novel focuses on the lives of three early women pilots--Elsie McKay, Ruth Elder and Mabel Boll--each striving to be the first woman to complete a flight across the Atlantic Ocean.

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