Eric Alan

Music, Arts & Culture Host

Eric Alan is KLCC’s music, arts and culture host. The music performances he hosts on KLCC air during Q; his interviews and features air during The Takeaway, The World and other programs. Previously, he spent seventeen years at Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, where he was music director and host of the daily music show Open Air. He is a nationally published author and photographer with three books to his credit, ranging from nature spirituality to major league baseball. He also works with National Geographic photographer Dewitt Jones, regularly contributing words and photographs to the project “Celebrate What’s Right with the World.” He is an accomplished lyricist as well, with credits ranging from international recording artists Gypsy Soul to the Oregon Cabaret Theatre.

Ways to Connect

  An interview with Garvar Brummett, author and artist of The Scent of Jasmine Cools the Rage. It’s a memoir with stories and illustrations that chronicle his abuse, addiction, homelessness, and prison time.  He has recovered to become a drug and addiction counselor for Sponsors, Inc. He will read at Tsunami Books in Eugene on Thursday evening, January 21st at 7 p.m. 

Photo by Lindsey McCarthy

  As part of the Eugene Symphony’s 50th anniversary season, Giancarlo Guerrero returns to conduct music by Respighi and Durufle on Thursday evening, January 21st. He speaks with Eric Alan about his tenure in Eugene, his new life in Nashville, and his vision for the symphony. 

Photo by Eric Alan

  Pretty Gritty is the musical duo of Sarah Wolff and Blaine Heinonen, who began their musical partnership in Maryland some years ago, before relocating to Portland. Since releasing a self-titled debut album in 2012 that featured a guest appearance by Keller Williams, they have been turning heads nationwide with their soulful Americana.

Photo by Jay Blakesberg

  The Winter Music Festival in Florence has evolved from its origins as a traditional folk festival to becoming more expansive. Eric Alan speaks to Sandy Kuhlman about the evolution, in an interview that includes music from Shook Twins, Jonathan Edwards and Danny Barnes. The festival is Saturday and Sunday, January 16th and 17th. 

  Twenty-five years ago, Marc Cohn had a hit with “Walking in Memphis,” from an album that became the best-selling debut of the 1990s. He celebrates the anniversary with a concert at the Shedd in Eugene on Monday, January 18th, and reflects with Eric Alan about the musical and personal course of those years.

Photo by Eric Alan

  The Jacobs Gallery in Eugene will close on January 31st. City of Eugene Cultural Services will host a community conversation about future uses for the Jacobs Gallery space, on January 13th at the Hult Center Studio at 5:30 p.m. Eric Alan speaks with gallery board member Katy Szekely about her perspectives on the conversation, and the future of the space. 

  Four hundred years after William Shakespeare’s death, one copy of the first collected works of his material is on display at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

Photo by Eric Alan

Country Hammer is a band with a broad take on American music, with particular roots in both early country music and modern, but sometimes reaching into elements of Motown, Mexican Norteno music and roots rock. After releasing their debut full-length CD, The Flower of Muscle Shoals, in 2014, they brought songs from their forthcoming CD Weight of the World to the KLCC studios as well. They perform at Sam Bond’s Garage on Wednesday, January 6th, in Eugene. 

  The State of the Arts series concludes with thoughts from Joshua Purvis, Executive Director of the Eugene Film Society, and co-creator of the Technology and Arts Downtown initiative. He speaks about what steps it will take for the local film scene to gain true momentum; how technological advances are revolutionizing film making and distribution; and how technology and the arts are inextricably intertwined. 

  A look at the modern music scene in the Willamette Valley with William Kennedy, the primary music writer for the Eugene Weekly, as well as a writer for several other publications, and a veteran of seventeen years of music retail work. He highlights positive local changes in venues and booking strategies, the success of a cassette-only music label in Eugene, and the role of the Internet in creating national success for the local band This Patch of Sky, which rarely plays in its own town. 

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