Eric Alan

Music, Arts & Culture Host

Eric Alan is KLCC’s music, arts and culture host. The interviews and performances he hosts air on KLCC as local inserts during programs including The Takeaway, Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and The World . Previously, he spent seventeen years at Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, where he was music director and host of the daily music show Open Air. He is a nationally published author and photographer with three books to his credit, ranging from nature spirituality to major league baseball. He also works with National Geographic photographer Dewitt Jones, regularly contributing words and photographs to the project “Celebrate What’s Right with the World.” He is an accomplished lyricist as well, with credits ranging from international recording artists Gypsy Soul to the Oregon Cabaret Theatre. He has served on the board of the Lane County Cultural Coalition, and is a founding board member of Cerro Gordo Land Conservancy. 

Ways to Connect

  Dorothy Velasco reviews the Oregon Shakespeare Festival's productions of Richard II and The Winter's Tale.

New Yorker cartoonist Matt Diffee speaks with Eric Alan about his unintentional cartooning career, which has included his new book Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People, and editing three volumes of  The Rejection Collection: Cartoons You Never Saw and Never Will See In the New Yorker. 

  Historian and author Michael Helquist speaks with Eric Alan about his biography Marie Equi: Radical Politics and Outlaw Passions. Equi was one of Oregon’s first women doctors, as well as a fierce advocate for worker’s rights, reproductive rights, and many other social justice causes. Michael Helquist speaks at the Downtown Eugene Public Library on Saturday, August 6th at 3 p.m. 

Identity is a key issue in a multi-cultural world, and ¿Identity? is the name of an exhibit at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art by multi-cultural artists Victoria Suescum and Lee Michael Peterson. As part of the museum’s current focus on “American Identity,” it explores elements of identifying as Latino and Latina within American culture, through art and personal experience.

Whose Life Is It Anyway?

Jul 1, 2016

  The play Whose Life Is It Anyway? examines quality of life issues through the eyes of a paralyzed sculptor, portrayed by Blake Beardsley in the Very Little Theatre’s Stage Left production, July 1st through 10th. It’s directed by Cindy Solari , whose own medical journey offers parallels to that of the central character. Cindy and Blake speak with Eric Alan about issues and choices that can affect us all. 

Photo by Bryan Rodriguez

  Tracktown: the Movie is a film by Jeremy Teicher and Alexi Pappas that blends the truth of an elite runner’s life with a fictional story. The movie’s Eugene debut is at the McDonald Theatre on July 5th, while co-director and star Alexi Pappas is training to run with the Greek Olympic Team in Rio. Eric Alan speaks with Jeremy Teicher, in an interview that includes clips from the film.  

 KLCC and the Oregon Bach Festival continued their annual tradition of celebrating the festival's opening with an hour-long special live broadcast from KLCC's SELCO Performance Hall on Tuesday, June 21st. Baroque violin duo Alice Blankenship and Alison Luthmers Tessier treated a live studio audience to a varied program of music ranging from Bach and Telemann to traditional and modern Swedish folk music. The evening was co-hosted by KLCC's Eric Alan, and OBF Executive Director Janelle McCoy. 

  In remembrance of the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, Pacific International Choral Festivals (Picfest) presents Shakespeare and All That Jazz at the First Baptist Church in Eugene on Sunday, June 26th. It features the legendary jazz band the Yellowjackets; the youthful three-hundred-voice Picfest Festival Chorus; and the world premiere of a composition by British composer and conductor Bob Chilcott.

Photo by Eric Alan

  Makrokosmos Project is a cutting-edge piano music festival celebrating living American composers and featuring Pacific Northwest performers. Duo Stephanie and Saar speak with Eric Alan about music from Frederic Rzewski to John Adams and Philip Glass. The festival is at Oveissi and Company in Eugene on Sunday, June 26th. 

Photo by Eric Alan

  Craig Chee and Sarah Maisel are both masters of the ukulele, with roots from Hawaii to Alabama and the UO. They’ve come together as a duo in life and music, and have returned to the Willamette Valley for an performance as part of Aloha Friday on June 17th, at 6 p.m. at Whirled Pies Downtown in Eugene—formerly Cozmic. Craig Chee and Sarah Maisel visited the KLCC studios, along with bassist Milo Fultz. 

Photo by Eric Alan

  Bearcoon is the musical duo of Andrea Walker and Solange Igoa, from Long Beach, California. As a result of being grand prize winners at the Buskerfest music festival, they were able to record their debut CD El Guapo.

Photo by Eric Alan

  Ruth Moody’s music has made its way into the world from Winnipeg, whether it’s her solo CDs, her key part in the band the Wailin’ Jennys, or touring and recording with Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits. Her most recent CD is These Wilder Things, and she’s touring with her quartet, the Ruth Moody Band. They’ll appear at Tsunami Books tonight, Thursday, June 9th, with Jeffrey Martin opening the show at 7:30 p.m. They also perform on Friday and Saturday in the Dalles and Portland, and in Bend on Sunday, June 12th as part of the House Concerts in the Glen at Newport Hills.

  DanceAbility International has brought people with and without disabilities together through dance for over twenty-five years in twenty-five countries. They’re now expanding their local reach through teacher trainings co-sponsored by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, other classes and events. Founder Alito Alessi speaks with Eric Alan about how the languages of dance and community expand through diversity.  

Photo by Eric Alan

  Songwriter Ben Bochner splits his time between Eugene and Austin, Texas. He’s been a finalist at Kerrville Folk Festival in Texas, has been working on recordings with David Jacobs-Strain, and was infamously known as the Rogue Reader after being a controversial part of Ken Kesey’s group novel-writing project at the University of Oregon. 

  Vocalist, fiddler and songwriter Carrie Rodriguez has gained acclaim over the course of a career that has taken her from her native Austin, Texas to Carnegie Hall, A Prairie Home Companion to The Today Show.

Photo by Eric Alan

  The Mims House became the first black-owned property in Eugene in 1948, after previous ordinances prohibited people of color from purchasing property or living within city limits. Eric Alan speaks with Willie Mims about the living history there, including visits from Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald.

    

  The troupe Che Malambo brings the rhythmic dance of Argentina’s 17th century gauchos into the present. Producer Matthew Bledsoe speaks with Eric Alan about the rhythms, the cultural heritage and compelling history of the dance. Che Malambo performs at the Hult Center on Thursday, May 26th. 

Photo by Eric Alan

  The Dema Ensemble is a new group that weaves drumming, dancing, singing and other forms of visual and physical storytelling from a variety of African cultures. 

Photo by Eric Alan

  Shawn James and the Shapeshifters are an Arkansas quintet whose music has crossed many boundaries of rock and folk, blues and soul.

Photo by Richard Avedon

  DJ Spooky, a.k.a. Dr. Paul D. Miller, speaks with Eric Alan about the world premiere of his composition “Heart of a Forest” in Corvallis on May 18th The piece is based on his residencies in the H.J. Andrews Experimental forest, and merges electronic music with the OSU Wind Ensemble. DJ Spooky is a multi-media artist, author and hip-hop turntablist whose credits include collaborations with Yoko Ono, Chuck D of Public Enemy, and a residency at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. 

  Roseburg’s free concert series, Music on the Half Shell, celebrates its 25th anniversary season in 2016. Kelly Leonard speaks with Eric Alan about a unique tradition of connection between audience and artists. He also shares music from a few of this year’s performers, including Luisa Maita (“loo-EE-suh MY-tuh”), Leroy Bell, James Hunter and Pink Martini. 

  Author and Eugene Register-Guard columnist Dorcas Smucker speaks with Eric Alan about the music of Amish, Mennonite and German traditions, and how modern technology affects those musical traditions in family life. Dorcas Smucker will appear on The Back Porch with Pete LaVelle on KLCC on Saturday evening, May 14th, to share many songs from those traditions. 

  Ben Saunders is curator of the exhibit “Aliens, Monsters and Madmen: the Art of EC Comics,” opening May 14th at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. He speaks with Eric Alan about the enduring impact of the artistically striking and politically radical comic art that EC produced in the 1940s and ‘50s, which ranged from horror to humor. Ben Saunders is also the director of the UO's Comic Studies minor. 

  #Instaballet offers a chance for the audience to choreograph a dance, which is immediately turned into a fully-formed performance. Co-founder Antonio Anacan speaks with Eric Alan about creating in real time with the audience, about dance as acceptance, and about photographing dance as well. #Instaballet performs a dance of acceptance at the Midtown Arts Center in Eugene on Friday, May 6th, as part of First Friday ArtWalk. Antonio Anacan's dance photography will also be on display. 

  Guy Sigsworth is a classical harpsichordist and electronic dance music producer who has collaborated with Madonna, Bjork and many others, and led his own duo Frou Frou to pop stardom. He speaks with Eric Alan about whether pop music is rubbish, finding the soul in electronic machines, and the basic vitality of choral music. He’s in residency at the UO School of Music and Dance this week.   

Photo by Eric Alan

  Anna Tivel and Beth Wood came by to perform live in the KLCC studios. They’ll perform live at Tsunami Books in Eugene on Saturday, May 7th beginning at 7:30 p.m. It’s a dual CD release event, celebrating Anna Tivel’s new CD Heroes Waking Up and Beth Wood’s new one, Spring Tide.

  The 13th annual Archaeology Channel Film and Video Festival tells a visual human story, May 9th through 15th in Eugene, in a vastly expanded festival that also includes a Conference on Cultural Heritage Media, and a variety of other events. Director Rick Pettigrew speaks with Eric Alan about the Antikythera Mechanism, a two-thousand-year-old Greek computer featured in the film The X-Ray Time Machine. He also talks about the unique cultural exchange between Iran and Eugene, and the challenges of overcoming visa issues for foreign filmmakers.     

  Reverend Billy of the Church of Stop Shopping turns his attention to climate change in his new book and CD, The Earth Wants YOU! He speaks with Eric Alan about weather as a form of communication, about launching a revolution by singing in big box stores, and why it’s worth getting arrested seventy times (so far). Reverend Billy gives a book reading at Kalapuya Books/Axe and Fiddle in Cottage Grove on Friday, April 29th.  

  A Woman’s Guide to the Wild is the first outdoor guidebook specifically addressing women’s unique wilderness needs. Author Ruby McConnell speaks with Eric Alan about correcting the perceived outdoor gender gap, particularly when women have long been leaders in the environmental movement. 

  The Thin Green Line is a conference that will gather activists, artists, writers, scientists, policy makers and others to explore creative resistance to fossil fuel development in the Pacific Northwest.

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