Eric Alan

Music, Arts & Culture Host

Eric Alan is KLCC’s music, arts and culture host. The interviews and performances he hosts air on KLCC as local inserts during programs including The Takeaway, Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and The World . Previously, he spent seventeen years at Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, where he was music director and host of the daily music show Open Air. He is a nationally published author and photographer with three books to his credit, ranging from nature spirituality to major league baseball. He also works with National Geographic photographer Dewitt Jones, regularly contributing words and photographs to the project “Celebrate What’s Right with the World.” He is an accomplished lyricist as well, with credits ranging from international recording artists Gypsy Soul to the Oregon Cabaret Theatre. He has served on the board of the Lane County Cultural Coalition, and is a founding board member of Cerro Gordo Land Conservancy. 

Ways to Connect

Drawing by Dan Pegoda

  Fictional candidate Thomas Jerry is running to become Oregon’s first Third Senator, in the interactive murder mystery comedy Murder on the Campaign Trail.  Candidate Jerry (as channeled by actor William Campbell) visits with Eric Alan and details his unusual platform positions on oil, guns, marijuana and the Supreme Court. The play runs through April 30th at the Springfield Holiday Inn. 

Photo by Jim Lommasson

  Wars are never truly over for veterans and their families, refugees, and citizens whose homelands are devastated. Photographer Jim Lommasson has explored those issues in his books Exit Wounds: Soldiers’ Stories—Life after Iraq and Afghanistan, and What We Carried: Fragments from the Cradle of Civilization.

Photo by Maani Vadgama

  For the past quarter-century, MEDGE—the Middle Eastern Dance Guild of Eugene—has brought Middle Eastern dance and music to the region through performance and education.

  The classic lyric opera Eugene Onegin melds the music of Tchaikovsky with the literature of Alexander Pushkin, creating a romantic and dramatic piece. Eugene Opera will do a fully-orchestrated version with an international cast on Friday, March 11th and Sunday, March 13th at the Hult Center in Eugene. Eugene Opera general director Mark Beudert and music director Andrew Bisantz speak with Eric Alan.

  Author and philosopher Lori Gruen speaks about “Justice and Empathy Beyond the Human.” She talks with Eric Alan about the ability of chimpanzees and other animals to teach us about better relationships. She appears on Thursday, March 10th on the UO campus, as part of Oregon Humanities Center’s year-long focus on justice.

Photo by Ariel Ogden

 

  University Theatre presents Scorched, a play by  Lebanese-Canadian playwright Wajdi Mouawad that examines the nature of war survivors’ emotional realities, in a way that illuminates current conflicts. Director Michael Najjar--whose parents also fled a Lebanese conflict--and cast member Jerilyn Armstrong speak with Eric Alan. The play runs March 3rd through 13th at the Hope Theatre on the UO campus. 

  The Oregon Bach Festival welcomes its new executive director, Janelle McCoy, who is an accomplished mezzo soprano and arts administrator. Eric Alan speaks with her about her priorities and vision for moving the festival forward in 2016 and beyond.  

Photo by Brian Lanker. Used by permission of Brian Lanker's estate, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

  The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art features From the Heart: the Photographs of Brian Lanker, a retrospective of the late photographer’s work. Eric Alan speaks about his legacy with his widow Lynda Lanker, an accomplished artist herself and the subject of his Pulitzer Prize-winning series on natural childbirth. The exhibit is on display now through April 24th. 

Quetzal, Live at KLCC

Feb 24, 2016
Photo by Eric Alan

  The Grammy-winning ensemble Quetzal has come out of East L.A.’s Chicano community to create a vision that integrates music, dance and community activism in truly global ways.

  The Eugene Concert Choir presents the Burt Bacharach Songbook at the Hult Center in Eugene on Saturday, February 27th, with the Vicki Brabham Combo, Bill Hulings, Shirley Andress, and Oliver Bacharach, Burt’s son. They’ll celebrate  Burt Bacharach’s songwriting legacy, which includes over seventy top 40 hits, six Grammy awards, three Academy Awards, and more. Oliver Bacharach and Vicki Brabham visited the KLCC studios.

  

Photo by Eric Alan

  The Westerlies are a New York-based brass quartet with Seatte roots that blurs the borders between chamber music, folk music and jazz. Their acclaimed debut album in 2014 explored the music of keyboardist and composer Wayne Horvitz, and their forthcoming album is a collaboration with GRAMMY-winning producer Jesse Lewis. They’re on a west coast tour that includes a Eugene performance on Friday, February 19th, as part of the Broadway Avenue House Concerts series. They came in to perform live in the KLCC studios. 

  The percussion and flute duo Caballito Negro  brings Songlines to Corvallis on February 19th, Lincoln City on February 27th and Roseburg on February 28th. Songlines is a set of performances and workshops that takes listeners from South Africa to Turkmenistan and even Los Angeles. Band members Tessa Brinckman and Terry Longshore share music and conversation with Eric Alan. 

  An interview with Richard Leebrick, whose new project Live on Wings of Love: A Journey to PeggySioux  is what he calls “a children’s story for adults”-- a story of addiction recovery and love. It includes a book, artwork and an audio CD. Richard Leebrick will host a release event at Tsunami Books in Eugene on Saturday, February 20th.

  Eugene Ballet presents Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana at the Hult Center on February 13th and 14th, with Orchestra Next and the Eugene Concert Choir. Eric Alan speaks with artistic director Toni Pimble and soprano Zulimar Lopez-Hernandez about the joys and challenges of the classic piece.  

Percussionist and vocalist Ruth Heald of the band Goldfoot speaks with Eric Alan and shares music from the band’s release On the Floor, before the band appears at the Lane Events Center on Saturday, February 13th as a featured band at the KLCC Microbrew Festival. 

Photo by John Stark

  Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn are the ultimate banjo family, who individually and together have challenged and expanded the boundaries of the instrument, whether in duo, within their Sparrow Quartet or with an array of their other bands and projects.

  South African vocal ensemble Ladysmith Black Mambazo has been making music for over fifty years, and will appear at the WOW Hall in Eugene on Tuesday evening, January 26th.

Photo by Eric Alan

  Dreos is a trio that features Eliot Grasso on uillean pipes and flute, Glen Waddell on guitar and bouzouki, and Brandon Vance on fiddle, integrating Irish and Scottish musical traditions. Though they have vast international credits in other contexts, they released their first CD together in October, and will perform in Eugene on Friday, January 29th at the New Hope Center Auditorium in Eugene.  Eliot Grasso brought his uillean pipes to the KLCC studios for a solo performance, and to share music from the new Dreos CD, The Clearing

  An interview with Garvar Brummett, author and artist of The Scent of Jasmine Cools the Rage. It’s a memoir with stories and illustrations that chronicle his abuse, addiction, homelessness, and prison time.  He has recovered to become a drug and addiction counselor for Sponsors, Inc. He will read at Tsunami Books in Eugene on Thursday evening, January 21st at 7 p.m. 

Photo by Lindsey McCarthy

  As part of the Eugene Symphony’s 50th anniversary season, Giancarlo Guerrero returns to conduct music by Respighi and Durufle on Thursday evening, January 21st. He speaks with Eric Alan about his tenure in Eugene, his new life in Nashville, and his vision for the symphony. 

Photo by Eric Alan

  Pretty Gritty is the musical duo of Sarah Wolff and Blaine Heinonen, who began their musical partnership in Maryland some years ago, before relocating to Portland. Since releasing a self-titled debut album in 2012 that featured a guest appearance by Keller Williams, they have been turning heads nationwide with their soulful Americana.

Photo by Jay Blakesberg

  The Winter Music Festival in Florence has evolved from its origins as a traditional folk festival to becoming more expansive. Eric Alan speaks to Sandy Kuhlman about the evolution, in an interview that includes music from Shook Twins, Jonathan Edwards and Danny Barnes. The festival is Saturday and Sunday, January 16th and 17th. 

  Twenty-five years ago, Marc Cohn had a hit with “Walking in Memphis,” from an album that became the best-selling debut of the 1990s. He celebrates the anniversary with a concert at the Shedd in Eugene on Monday, January 18th, and reflects with Eric Alan about the musical and personal course of those years.

Photo by Eric Alan

  The Jacobs Gallery in Eugene will close on January 31st. City of Eugene Cultural Services will host a community conversation about future uses for the Jacobs Gallery space, on January 13th at the Hult Center Studio at 5:30 p.m. Eric Alan speaks with gallery board member Katy Szekely about her perspectives on the conversation, and the future of the space. 

  Four hundred years after William Shakespeare’s death, one copy of the first collected works of his material is on display at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

Photo by Eric Alan

Country Hammer is a band with a broad take on American music, with particular roots in both early country music and modern, but sometimes reaching into elements of Motown, Mexican Norteno music and roots rock. After releasing their debut full-length CD, The Flower of Muscle Shoals, in 2014, they brought songs from their forthcoming CD Weight of the World to the KLCC studios as well. They perform at Sam Bond’s Garage on Wednesday, January 6th, in Eugene. 

  The State of the Arts series concludes with thoughts from Joshua Purvis, Executive Director of the Eugene Film Society, and co-creator of the Technology and Arts Downtown initiative. He speaks about what steps it will take for the local film scene to gain true momentum; how technological advances are revolutionizing film making and distribution; and how technology and the arts are inextricably intertwined. 

  A look at the modern music scene in the Willamette Valley with William Kennedy, the primary music writer for the Eugene Weekly, as well as a writer for several other publications, and a veteran of seventeen years of music retail work. He highlights positive local changes in venues and booking strategies, the success of a cassette-only music label in Eugene, and the role of the Internet in creating national success for the local band This Patch of Sky, which rarely plays in its own town. 

  Aaron Ragan-Fore, Director of Communications for the UO School of Music and Dance, examines the crossover between the university and the surrounding valley, through creative partnerships and audience outreach. He also explores the valley's rich offerings in the dance and music worlds, and traces how the flow of alumni into the greater creative community supports local artistic growth.

  Liora Sponko, Executive Director of the Lane Arts Council, speaks about the role of nonprofit organizations in the continued health of the arts world, including a new approach to middle school arts education via the collaborative ArtCore program. She also talks about the collaboration between businesses and artists to increase opportunities for the display of visual arts, and the best strategies for inclusion of the Latino community and other ethnic groups within the arts. 

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