Jacob Lewin

Reporter

Jacob Lewin is a veteran  radio journalist whose work has been featured on Morning Edition, Marketplace, the Northwest News Network, and Oregon Public Broadcasting as well as KLCC-FM/Eugene.

He was also News Director at KINK-FM/Portland. His awards include an Edward R. Murrow for sound and a Scripps-Howard for radio journalism.  His beat for KLCC includes Latino issues, Oregon’s  rural/urban divide, and coverage of the coast, the north Willamette Valley, and central Oregon.

Ways to Connect

Oregon is seeing a big increase in the number of Latinos applying for citizenship.  The main reason is the presidential candidacy of Donald Trump and his anti-immigrant rhetoric.

In Albany and Corvallis, he's a music teacher and guitarist, but in New Mexico, he's a star.  We're talking about Chris Arellano.

It doesn't seem to make sense.  Oregon students get average scores on national tests, but rank near the bottom in high school graduation rates.  Just over one in four Oregon high school students doesn't graduate in four years.

NPR

NPR Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez talks with KLCC's Jacob Lewin.

Claudio Sanchez will give a public talk Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock at the UO Knight Law Center. Room 175

Spanish and English have been in contact with each other since colonial times. A University of Oregon professor has brought them together for a new class called "Spanglish."

Jacob Lewin

More than one in four of Oregon's high school students don't graduate...or at least don't graduate on time.  The U.S. Department of Education ranks the state 47th, although that's up from 49th a year ago.

Dave's Killer Bread

The United States has five percent of the world's population, but twenty-five percent of its prison inmates.  The state of Oregon mirrors the national numbers.  Now, a bipartisan prison  reform movement is picking up steam and Oregon is playing a part.

"You Say Latino"

Sep 16, 2015
James Newman

There's a difference between the terms Hispanic and Latino. Or maybe there's not. An Oregon comic artist wanted to find out, and the result has sparked a national conversation.

The idea for this story came from KLCC general manager John Stark who had a hunch that the drought in California might be benefiting Oregon agriculture. He turned out to be right (even bosses can be right at times.) He suggested comparing almonds and hazelnuts. Almonds take a gallon of water each

to grow. Hazelnuts make it with just Oregon rain.

 

Jacob Lewin

The agriculture industry in California is in the midst of its worst drought in decades and that may inadvertently be having a positive impact on Oregon. It's caused some growers to look north.  One Oregon crop that is being affected is hazelnuts, which are drawing record sales and prices. 

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