Jacob Lewin

Reporter

Jacob Lewin is a veteran  radio journalist whose work has been featured on Morning Edition, Marketplace, the Northwest News Network, and Oregon Public Radio as well as KLCC-FM/Eugene.

He was also News Director at KINK-FM/Portland. His awards include an Edward R. Murrow for sound and a Scripps-Howard for radio journalism.  His beat for KLCC includes Latino issues, Oregon’s  rural/urban divide, and coverage of the coast, the north Willamette Valley, and central Oregon.

Ways To Connect

Oregon Lottery

Half of all Oregonians play the state lottery and up to five percent of them are problem gamblers. The Lottery is now aiming more help at Latino problem gamblers.  At the same time, in a departure from the past, it is also now promoting its games to Latinos and other minorities. 

Octavio would head to the video poker machines at Shari's before work and Denny's after work every day and all day on weekends:

"El juego no fue algo divertido despues, fue una necesidad..."

Corvallis Schools

Oregon spends Cadillac prices to teach English Language Learners in its public schools, but only gets Chevy results.  That's because the formula for spending more than 200-million-dollars a year on tens of thousands of students provides an incentive to keep kids in E.L.L. as long as possible. E.L.L. was formerly known as E.S.L.  The Oregon Department of Education is now proposing to make some major reforms. 

When she was in elementary school, this was about the extent of Stephanie Castañeda's Spanish:

"Hola...adios."

Milagro

It's a milestone for Oregon's only professional Latino theater group...30 years of performances.  Milagro Theater comes to Roseburg next month.

(sounds of set building)

Milagro is getting a show ready to go on the road. The painted cloth, canvas and rope emulate a circus. Co-founder Dañel Malan says that goes back to the roots of Latin American peasant theater:

"The campesino came from the old tradition of carpa, so that was how they would do the shows, in a tent."

Milagro

It's a milestone for Oregon's only professional Latino theater group...30 years of performances.  Milagro Theater comes to Roseburg next month.

(sounds of set building)

Milagro is getting a show ready to go on the road. The painted cloth, canvas and rope emulate a circus. Co-founder Dañel Malan says that goes back to the roots of Latin American peasant theater:

"The campesino came from the old tradition of carpa, so that was how they would do the shows, in a tent."

mount angel seminary

This Christmas, Catholic churches in Oregon will likely be seeing a decline in the number of Latino parishioners.   A new Pew Research Center study shows that Latinos are increasingly leaving the Catholic church with a quarter of the Latinos in the U.S. saying they are ex-Catholics.

(Sound of church bells)

At Mount Angel seminary, there's been a sustained effort to recruit students from Latin American countries.  Still, while more than 50-percent of Catholics in Oregon are Latinos, fewer than 10-percent of priests are:

"I think we've been falling short."

susan komen oregon

When an Oregon Latina gets breast cancer, there is a significant chance that it will be more serious than breast cancer found among other women. A variety of groups are trying to do something to change that:

Proportionately fewer Latinas in Oregon get breast cancer, but 36-percent of Latinas who do get breast cancer have it detected at an advanced stage compared to 26-percent of other women. Thomas Bruner is former CEO of the Susan Komen Foundation of Oregon:

September is one of the big harvest months for Oregon agriculture--apples, pears, hops.  It's also a time when the fields are full of farmworkers.....a large percentage of whom may be subject to sexual harassment.  It's a subject that's long been taboo, but a growing number of women are speaking out.

Every day at her job at a vineyard outside Salem, things were the same for Clarisa:

"Pues como chiquita, mi hijita, esos cosas de decía..."

Camp Starlight

Kids from around the Northwest come to summer camp in the hills west of Salem this week.  But this camp is like no other in the region.

(sound of splashing in a pool)

Like most summer camps, Camp Starlight has swimming, games like Sharks and Lifeguards, archery, movie night.  But there's a difference:

"My name is Randy Bodkin and I'm the Camp Starlight director.  This is a camp for kids that are affected by HIV/AIDS.  Doesn't necessarily have to be them themselves who are affected with HIV/AIDS. It could be a direct family member,  Mom, Dad, Grandma, Grandpa, aunt."

Walidah Imarisha

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Civil Rights Act. We celebrate it at a time when Oregon's population is not quite two-percent African-American.  A Portland State University professor is criss-crossing the state asking this provocative question: Why aren't there more blacks in Oregon?

It was a bittersweet commemoration as a packed auditorium listened to the Northwest Freedom Singers and heard Portland State University professor Walidah Imarisha says that in the 1840's, Oregon became the only U.S. territory with a racial exclusion law:

Jacob Lewin

It is a colorful ritual that many Latinos brought with them when they immigrated to Oregon, and it is now more popular than ever. Quinceaneras celebrate the 15th birthday of Latino girls, but they are much more than just a big party.

Ileana Torres is being fitted for her quinceanera dress (zipper sound) at a Salem shop that specializes in them.  Quinceaneras once were a way to present girls as ready for marriage. Now they're a rite of passage when, at the age of 15 girls, like Ileana, are expected to take on more responsibility:

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