Rachael McDonald

Morning Edition Host / Reporter

Rachael McDonald started her career at KLCC as a volunteer in the newsroom in 2000.  Rachael was hired by the Northwest News Network to establish their Richland bureau in 2004. She reported on the progress of cleanup at Hanford Nuclear Reservation, chemical weapons destruction at the Umatilla Chemical Depot, agriculture and wine. Rachael returned to KLCC in 2007 to be the host of Morning Edition. She also reports on Lane County, forest issues and a variety of other local and regional stories. Rachael has a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Oregon. Rachael has won numerous awards for her reporting including first place from PRNDI for her story "Garden Brings Community Together" and for her interview with Naseem Rhaka, author of "The Crying Tree".  Rachael enjoys reading, hiking, biking and cooking.

Ways To Connect

kval.com

Lane Transit District is considering boosting its payroll tax starting as soon as next year. The LTD board says the additional income will help it restore bus services to the area.

With an improving economy, LTD says it's exploring an increase from $7 to $8 per $1000 dollars of payroll over 10 years. LTD's Andy Vobora says it's still deliberating on how soon to begin implementation.

Lane County

Lane County voters strongly rejected a proposed vehicle registration fee to fund road repairs. The vote was 66% against and 33% in support. The fee would have raised $11-million a year.

Lane County faces a $9-million deficit in its road fund. The measure would have raised $6 million for county roads and about 5 million for city roads. County spokeswoman Anne Marie Levis says the outcome is disappointing, but the message is clear.

Lucy Ohlsen / KLCC

Oregon's congressional delegation has sent a letter to the Postmaster General asking her to reconsider closing processing centers in Springfield and Bend. The closures are slated for October 31st.

Lane Council of Governments

A free smart-phone application is aimed at helping transportation planners better understand people's biking habits in Eugene and Springfield.

ORcycle allows bicyclists to track their routes and report dangerous locations. Josh Roll with Lane Council of Governments says the app gathers data to help inform transportation planners. It was developed by Portland State University and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Brian Davies / Register Guard (pool)

Monday, a State judge ruled against a climate change lawsuit brought by two Eugene teens. The suit sought to force Oregon lawmakers to do more to reduce carbon emissions and help prevent climate change.

Oregon State Parks

Numbered signs along the Oregon coast help visitors identify their location in an emergency.  The large, bright, yellow signs are visible from the beach, air and offshore.

Tourists on the coast sometimes find it hard to describe exactly where they are, especially while walking on the beach. Captain Jim Kusz with North Lincoln Fire and Rescue says the project has been underway for some time. He says the signs were first installed along the central coast.

USGS

Eugene Water and Electric Board is suing the firm that designed and engineered a roll-gate lifting system on the Leaburg Dam. Two of the three gates have failed.

Senator Floyd Prozanski

The Oregon legislature may extend its statute of limitations for rape and sexual assault to 12 years. That bill is expected to get a public hearing in the next 2 weeks in Salem.

Last month, the state house voted to double the statute of limitations for people to report sexual assault. The bill is now in the Senate Judiciary committee, which is chaired by Democratic Senator Floyd Prozanksi. He says the statute of limitations is currently at 6 years.

Rachael McDonald

As the weather warms up in the Pacific Northwest, more people are riding their bicycles. But in bike-friendly college towns like Eugene and Corvallis, bike theft also increases during the spring and summer.

It's a story many people who commute by bicycle know well. Eugene resident Aaron Brussat had locked his bike outside of Falling Sky Home Fermentation Supply Shop, where he worked.

Oregon Live

Long-time Register Guard editor and publisher, Tony Baker, is stepping down. The Eugene daily paper has hired the head of The Oregonian Media Group to take his place.

Baker has been at the helm of the Register-Guard for 28 years. N. Christian Anderson III led the Oregonian through a transition to a digital-first organization.  

Former Dean of the U of O School of Journalism and Communication Tim Gleason says he expects change at the Guard.

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