Tiffany Eckert

Reporter

Tiffany Eckert has been a reporter at KLCC since 2008.

Ways To Connect

Residents in the rural community of Pleasant Hill have a new option when it comes to health care. As KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert reports, an urgent care clinic is now open for business.

Pleasant Hill Urgent Care may not have an expensive cat-scan or ultrasound. They don’t admit patients or perform surgery. But they do provide primary care. They offer x-ray services and can give I-V fluids and meds. If you need a bone set or a wound sutured, medical staff at this clinic can do it.

And no one will be turned away, even the uninsured.

Tiffany Eckert

Imagine overseeing a cultural event that employs hundreds of staff, raises millions of dollars and draws as many as 60-thousand people in a single weekend. That’s the Oregon Country Fair—and Charlie Ruff has been its General Manager since 2008. This summer, he’s passing the torch to longtime fair volunteer, Tom Gannon. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert speaks to both men about the leadership transition and what the historic Oregon Country Fair means to them.

WEB EXTRA BELOW

Tiffany Eckert

About 5,500 Oregonians live with HIV/AIDS. A quarter of them reside in rural areas. Eugene-based HIV alliance is the only aids service organization helping patients in the eastern and southern parts of the state. The agency recently received a grant to fund a unique, telehealth project for HIV-positive people in remote places.

In Oregon, nearly one in seven people infected with HIV Aids is unaware they have the disease. The longer someone goes without treatment, the greater the risk of spreading HIV. A simple test is available to anyone who wants to know their status.

Paul Homan, who has been HIV positive for 12 years, is Senior Program Manager with HIV Alliance. He says testing and treatment are the keys to breaking the viral transmission cycle.  

The police chief of Junction City is suing the municipality and the former City Administrator. Junction City Police Chief Mark Chase says his First Amendments rights were violated. In his complaint, he asserts he was denied due process when then-City Administrator, Melissa Bowers, discriminated against him based on his Christian faith.

Portland attorney Sean Riddell represents the Police Chief.

Transportation For America

More than five percent of all the bridges in Oregon are considered “structurally deficient.” KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert reports.

Deficient bridges are those in urgent need of repair or replacement. Transportation for America analyzed bridge conditions statewide and found 439 of them in trouble. According to the report, Linn County tops the list with 15% needing overhaul. Douglas County has 29 deficient bridges. Lane County, which has the most bridges in the state, comes in third for the most in need of repair.

Tiffany Eckert

A serious illness can be life-changing. It often leads to doctors and specialists, who evaluate, test and diagnose. Treatment becomes the means to recovery.  But what if a patient's condition is rare to a geographic region? In part two of our reports on “Invisible Illness”, KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert speaks to one Oregon woman about her plight to discover what’s been ailing her.

For thirty years, Deb Elder has been hurting. She says her chronic pain started after a traumatic accident. Then she was told she had Fibromyalgia. Deb describes her symptoms:

Tiffany Eckert

“Invisible Illness" is a moniker given to chronic conditions that seriously impair daily living --but have symptoms that are difficult to diagnose. Health advocates report worldwide sufferers number in the tens of millions. KLCC's Tiffany Eckert talks to patients with an invisible illness- who struggle to have their condition recognized and treated.

Kelly McCabe is a 41 year old mother of three.

Kelly: 07 “I suffered from some chronic fatigue and what I thought was cases of shingles since about 2006.”

SEIU Local 49

Caregivers and service employees in Eugene and Springfield voted to unionize Thursday night at  Sacred Heart PeaceHealth Medical Center. The nearly 11-hundred employees will now be members of the nation’s largest health care union. 

After the ballots were tallied, the “yes” votes took it.

“My name is Meg Neimi. I’m President of SEIU Local 49, the health care union. And, I’m standing right outside of Sacred Heart RiverBend Medical Center with a group of health care workers who are celebrating the fact that they have just won their union election resoundingly.”

peacehealth.org

Next week, “frontline” workers like surgical support aides and housekeepers at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Hospitals in Eugene and Springfield will vote whether or not to unionize.

Chris Tonry has worked in patient admissions at Sacred Heart for 36 years. She has never been a part of union. Next week, she plans to check the “yes” box to join Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 49. Tonry believes a union could help with inadequate pay raises and understaffing.

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