Tiffany Eckert


Tiffany Eckert has been a reporter at KLCC since 2008.

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Tiffany Eckert

A serious illness can be life-changing. It often leads to doctors and specialists, who evaluate, test and diagnose. Treatment becomes the means to recovery.  But what if a patient's condition is rare to a geographic region? In part two of our reports on “Invisible Illness”, KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert speaks to one Oregon woman about her plight to discover what’s been ailing her.

For thirty years, Deb Elder has been hurting. She says her chronic pain started after a traumatic accident. Then she was told she had Fibromyalgia. Deb describes her symptoms:

Tiffany Eckert

“Invisible Illness" is a moniker given to chronic conditions that seriously impair daily living --but have symptoms that are difficult to diagnose. Health advocates report worldwide sufferers number in the tens of millions. KLCC's Tiffany Eckert talks to patients with an invisible illness- who struggle to have their condition recognized and treated.

Kelly McCabe is a 41 year old mother of three.

Kelly: 07 “I suffered from some chronic fatigue and what I thought was cases of shingles since about 2006.”

SEIU Local 49

Caregivers and service employees in Eugene and Springfield voted to unionize Thursday night at  Sacred Heart PeaceHealth Medical Center. The nearly 11-hundred employees will now be members of the nation’s largest health care union. 

After the ballots were tallied, the “yes” votes took it.

“My name is Meg Neimi. I’m President of SEIU Local 49, the health care union. And, I’m standing right outside of Sacred Heart RiverBend Medical Center with a group of health care workers who are celebrating the fact that they have just won their union election resoundingly.”

Next week, “frontline” workers like surgical support aides and housekeepers at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Hospitals in Eugene and Springfield will vote whether or not to unionize.

Chris Tonry has worked in patient admissions at Sacred Heart for 36 years. She has never been a part of union. Next week, she plans to check the “yes” box to join Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 49. Tonry believes a union could help with inadequate pay raises and understaffing.

The battle to prohibit the cultivation of genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, continues in Oregon. In the upcoming special election, Benton County voters will decide if a measure to ban GMO's is right for them. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert spoke with people on both sides of the issue and filed this report.

On the face of it, Measure 2-89 seeks to protect local food sources by banning the cultivation of genetically modified crops anywhere in the county. The measure also promotes saving heritage seeds and a sort of “We the People” right to self-governance.

Pearl Wolfe

On January 28th, advocates and volunteers from 28 agencies conducted the annual homeless count in Lane County. They hit the streets and parks, looked under bridges, and checked in with shelters and churches. Lane County Human Services released the numbers Tuesday.

At one point in time, 1,473 un-housed people were counted. These are the “literally homeless” who stay in emergency transitional shelters or locations not meant for habitation-- like cars or doorways.

Wednesday the Register-Guard published a front page story headlined "Secret school emails released." The article outlined the contents of personal emails and text messages between individual Eugene 4-J school board members concerning Superintendent Sheldon Berman. (see statements below)

The documents were accidentally sent to the newspaper by the law firm representing the Eugene school district.

Wendy Baker is Chief Council with the Register Guard. She describes receiving the box of 500 documents. earlier this week.

Jes Burns

Monday the final closing on Civic Stadium and the surrounding property was completed. The nonprofit group Eugene Civic Alliance and more than 120 private donors, raised 4 million dollars to purchase the site from the city.

Last week, Governor Kate Brown declared drought emergency in two more Oregon counties—Wheeler and Baker. Currently, more than half of the state is eligible for emergency federal aid—and it's only April. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert spoke with one of the state’s leading climatologists about regional drought and what the future holds.

Whooping Cough is on the rise in Oregon. Deschutes County health officials report more than 20 cases since the first of the year. Lane County has confirmed nine.

The bacterial infection, Pertussis, is also known as whooping cough. The Chinese named it the "hundred day cough"—because of the severe spells it elicits.

(Cough sounds…)

According to the World Health Organization, 195,000 children die from the disease each year. Whooping cough is easily spread through coughs and sneezes.