Tiffany Eckert

Reporter

Tiffany Eckert has been a reporter at KLCC since 2008.

Ways To Connect

Tiffany Eckert

About forty percent of the children eligible for head start programs in Lane County can’t get in. Today (Tuesday), Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley visited a head start center in Eugene. While there, he criticized cuts to early childhood education in a recent U.S. senate budget.

At the Whiteaker Head Start Center a classroom of pre-kindergarteners welcome Senator Merkley with a song.

(kids and teacher sing:”Mr. Merkley’s here today! We’ll all clap our hands because Mr. Merkley’s here today!”)

Then, he sits in a little chair with a classic children’s book.

Tiffany Eckert

A contingency of first responders spent the afternoon (Wednesday) in downtown cottage grove running through scenarios for dealing with a natural gas pipeline emergency.

Williams Pipeline operates close to 4,000 miles of transmission pipeline through the Pacific Northwest. From the Columbia Gorge, pipes follow along Interstate-5, carrying compressed natural gas. They run through communities. Sometimes, lines cross railroad tracks.

Unemployment rates continue to drop in Lane and Douglas counties. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert speaks with a regional economist about the growth trend and what it means for communities.

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Lane County is the lowest since June of 2008. Douglas County is trending about the same, seeing its second consecutive month with job growth.

Brian Rooney watches tracks employment in both regions. He says growth brings a mixed bag of benefits.

Lane Blood Center

Lane Blood Center says recent trauma situations in area hospitals and reduced mobile blood drives have depleted inventories of negative blood types-- particularly the highly coveted-- “O” negative. They are actively seeking donations.

Some people give blood as a matter of course. When their eligibility comes back around, they show up at the blood bank, roll up their sleeve and donate. It’s all over in about 45 minutes. According to the Lane Blood Center, every donation saves up to three lives.

Eugene 4J has a new superintendent… almost. Now that the school board has formally offered Dr. Gustavo Balderas the job-- all they’re waiting for is his signature. And that is expected soon.

Eugene school board chair Jim Torrey says Balderas is a genuine and accessible manager. And he comes with a compelling life story.

Torrey: “His parents were migrant workers. He was actually born in the state of Washington, lived there a couple months, then his family moved over to Nyssa, Oregon. And he didn’t speak English until he started grade school.”

Spring is the time of year when people purchase baby poultry. Maybe they are replacing older birds. Sometimes they become gifts in an Easter basket. Health authorities have some precautions.

Chicks and ducklings are fuzzy and cute. But, many of them carry a bacteria that is dangerous--particularly to young children.

Dr. Emilio DeBess is Oregon's Public Health Veterinarian. He says between the months of March and May his office sees increased cases of Salmonella which are directly attributed to poultry.

srpenvironmental.com

The Oregon Association of Hospitals has developed a new initiative to make the cost of medical care known to patients in advance.  All of Oregon's 62 community hospitals have agreed to participate. KLCC's Tiffany Eckert explains what this means to patients with and without insurance.

When it comes to health care price transparency, a national rating system finds Oregon is failing, literally.

Davidson: "Oregon currently receives an F."

KEZI.com

A Eugene-based secure residential treatment center for the mentally ill was closed Monday after state officials suspended its license. The patients were taken to other facilities.

The ShelterCare Heeran Center Residence on Coburg Road housed 12 adults who required “high levels of psychiatric treatment.”  

Tiffany Eckert

KLCC's Tiffany Eckert visits the mass vaccination clinic at Matthew Knight Arena on the University of Oregon campus. The newly approved vaccine Trumenba is being administered to any undergraduate who wants it. As students trickle in for the vaccination, Tiffany spoke with Andre Le Duc, Executive Director of Enterprise Risk Services.

Tiffany Eckert

The second day of the "mass vax" clinic at the University of Oregon saw fewer students than anticipated. Pharmacists lined the halls of Matthew Knight Arena with Meningitis vaccinations at the ready. According to one care provider, students have been "trickling in."

Undergrad students who do show up are being walked through health questions and insurance paperwork. The UO is partnering with Albertson's and Safeway pharmacies to process insurance claims to the myriad providers, many of whom just approved coverage of the vaccine, Trumenba.

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