City Club of Eugene: Cruelty to Women, Here & Now

Mar 13, 2017

Recorded on: March 10, 2017

Air Date: March 13, 2017

Speakers:

  • Rachel Collins, Engagement Manager at Womenspace
  • Dr. Jon Davies, Director of the McKenzie River Men’s Center

Coordinator: Sandy Ericscon

Cruelty to Women, Here and Now, a look at the extent of abuse to women in the local region and what resources are available to the people affected. This program will examine a costly social, financial and moral problem for our community, a problem that is intolerable and causes all citizens to both pay for it and to suffer its consequences. Abuse of women is a cause of homelessness, lost work productivity, poor performance by children in school, high costs of police actions, high crime and health care statistics and many lost lives.

Consider the following statistics:

  • The costs of partner violence exceed $50 million each year in Oregon. In Lane County, households reporting partner violence have more than doubled in two years. Many survivors become homeless; over 9 percent of the Lane County homeless population cited domestic violence as a primary reason for their homelessness. And homeless women, and often their children, then become the most vulnerable segment of the homeless population.
  • In the USA a woman is battered, usually by her husband/partner, every 15 seconds (UN Study on the World’s Women, 2000). 63.84% of women who reported being raped, physically assaulted, and/or stalked since age 18 were victimized by a current or former husband, cohabiting partner, boyfriend, or date. (National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey 2010). Less than half of domestic violence incidents are reported to police.
  • The National College Women Sexual Victimization Study estimated that between 1 in 4 and 1 in 5 college women experience completed or attempted rape during their college years (Fisher 2000).
  • Men perpetrate the majority of violent acts against women (DeLahunta 1997) and almost two-thirds of all rapes are committed by someone who is known to the victim. (National Crime Victimization Survey, 2010). About half of all rape victims are in the lowest third of income distribution; half are in the upper two-thirds. (Violence against Women, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Dept. of Justice, 1994.)
  • Boys who witness their fathers’ violence are 10 times more likely to engage in spouse abuse in later adulthood than boys from non-violent homes.

Our speakers will discuss the problem, identify successful strategies for both victims and perpetrators who seek help and focus on what the community at large can do to prevent and treat all involved.

Speakers:

Rachel Collins, Engagement Manager at Womenspace, Inc. on Pearl St. in Eugene. Originally from Florida, Rachel worked as a student group organizer for Planned Parenthood before being hired on as Community Educator for the Greater Orlando affiliate prior to graduating from college in 2012. She worked with North Coast Rape Crisis team in Northern California before to moving to Eugene and she is the co-founder, co-director and a self-defense trainer for Warrior Sisters, a local Eugene, nonprofit that provides free verbal and physical self-defense education to women and girls. The Womenspace mission is to is to prevent domestic violence in intimate partner relationships in Lane County and support survivors in claiming personal power. Womenspace offers a 24hr crisis line advocacy for survivors, youth program, an emergency safe-house program, support groups, educational and outreach services, and more. They also are part of a statewide network of assistance organizations for women.

Dr. Jon Davies, a licensed psychologist, is a nationally recognized speaker and author on men’s health and violence prevention. He is Director of the McKenzie River Men’s Center whose mission is to help men lead healthy lives and reduce violence towards women. Jon served as Senior Staff Psychologist at the University of Oregon’s Counseling and Testing Center where he co-founded the UO Men’s Center. In 2011, Jon was named Practitioner of the Year by American Psychology Association’s Division 51, The Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinity. In 2013, Jon was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Lane County Psychologists’ Association.

copyright, KLCC 2017