Have Nothing To Wear To The Women's March? Eugene Screenprinter Can Help With That

Jan 19, 2018

Amy Baker, owner of Threadbare Print House, holds up the shirt with the Fiercely Feminist logo her company will print for attendees of Saturday's Women's March.
Credit Angela Kellner/KLCC

A female-owned screen-printing shop in Eugene is helping raise money for Planned Parenthood and get people geared up for Saturday’s women’s march.

Amy Baker is owner of Threadbare Print House. She just returned from Haiti where she toured a factory run by a company called Allmade Apparel. They employ Haitians who cut and sew some of the shirts Baker uses in her Eugene shop. The company provides living wage jobs and health care for the Haitian workers. The shirts are made from organic cotton and recycled plastic bottles. It’s part of Baker’s effort to be more socially conscious about the apparel industry. Before the women’s march last year, she opened her shop and invited people to bring a blank shirt to be printed with a Fiercely Feminist logo.

Baker: “Everyone was looking forward to marching the next day so it was a really powerful experience for us. We were really grateful to do it. We just put out a jar and said if you want to donate to Planned Parenthood, please do, and then at the end of the day we had raised over $4,000 so we were pretty blown away by that.”

Baker is doing the free screen printing at her Eugene shop Friday, January 19th, from 10am – 5pm and says donations will again go to Planned Parenthood. Threadbare Print House is located at 445 Lincoln St. in Eugene.

Amy Baker's selfie at the Allmade Apparel factory in Haiti.
Credit Amy Baker

Click the audio link below to hear an interview with Amy Baker about her recent trip to Haiti, what she experienced and how the company, Allmade Apparel, is disrupting the sweatshop industry of apparel manufacturing by providing living wage jobs, health care and transportation to Haitian workers.

Amy Baker, left, visited an orphanage in Haiti as part of her trip to tour the apparel factory run by Allmade.
Credit Courtesy of Amy Baker