Here & Now

Weekdays 9-11 a.m.
Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Phillip Morris May Enter E-Cigarette Market

Most e-cigarettes use liquid nicotine, but tobacco giant Phillip Morris will release a smart e-cigarette, that uses heated tobacco. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Since electronic cigarettes were introduced in 2003, they have grown in popularity as an alternative to tobacco products. However, there may be new competition coming to the market as cigarette giant Phillip Morris’ patent for Heat Sticks, a smart e-cigarette that uses heated tobacco, has been approved.

Unlike other e-cigarettes that use liquid nicotine to create a tobacco-flavored vapor, Heat Sticks contain real tobacco that will heat up to a maximum of 660 degrees Fahrenheit, similar to a pipe.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Colorado Considers Another 'Personhood' Amendment

So-called “personhood” initiatives will be on the ballot in two states on Election day: Measure One in North Dakota and Amendment 67 in Colorado.

“Personhood” may be a familiar term to Colorado voters by now because they’ve rejected two such measures in recent elections.

Those previous two measures were designed to ban abortion, but supporters of Amendment 67 say that’s not their goal this time around.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Colorado Public Radio’s Megan Verlee explains.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Senate Tracker: South Dakota No Longer A Shoo-in For Republicans

Photograph of Republican senate candiate Mike Rounds. (roundsforsenate)

In this week’s installment of the Senate Tracker series, we turn to South Dakota, which had been considered safe for Republican candidate and former governor Mike Rounds.

However, after some controversy surrounding a visa program under his governorship, independent candidate Larry Pressler and Democrat Rick Weiland are gaining ground.

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NPR Story
11:45 am
Tue October 14, 2014

E.O. Wilson On 'The Meaning Of Human Existence'

Naturalist E.O. Wilson, author of "The Meaning of Human Existence." (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Biologist and naturalist E.O. Wilson has written thirty books, won two Pulitzers, holds the title Professor Emeritus at Harvard and he is the world’s leading authority on ants.

Ants are featured in his new book, “The Meaning of Human Existence,” which has been longlisted for the National Book Award.

The book covers evolution, the coming of human consciousness, and humans’ ability to think about existence.

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NPR Story
11:45 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Stemming The Flow Of Central American Child Migrants

A police officer in Santa Ana, El Salvador teaches a group of sixth graders how to use computers as part of the GREAT program. (Jude Joffe-Block/KJZZ)

The once staggering number of Central American child migrants crossing the border has fallen dramatically in recent months.

But to discourage future migration flows, experts say the violence and poverty that helped trigger the exodus must be addressed.

In recent years, the U.S. spent $800 million on programs to address drug trafficking, gangs, and crime in Central America. And some of those programs are aimed specifically at helping young people.

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NPR Story
11:45 am
Tue October 14, 2014

An End to Flight Restrictions In Dallas

A Southwest Airlines flight Boeing 737 flies over Bachman Lake near Dallas (brentdanley/Flickr)

Today is the first day that Dallas airline and aviation officials will not have to contend with the federal law known as the Wright amendment.

For 35 years, the law restricted flights out of Dallas’ Love Field Airport, as a way to protect a fledgling Dallas-Fort Worth airport.

But it was allowed to expire yesterday, after a compromise reached by Southwest, American Airlines, the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, and the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

On Stage: Festival Seeks To Pass The Torch In Tango

A couple performing the Argentine tango at the Mesa Arts Center.(Garry Wilmore/Flickr)

On Friday we go “On Stage,” our look at what’s happening on the boards across the country.

This week, we go to New York City, where the Shall We Tango Festival is underway.

Polly Ferman, who is a touring pianist, created the festival.

She also created and directs the all-female tango group Glamour Tango.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

District Profile: A Cast Of Characters In Louisiana's Sixth

BATON ROUGE, LA - MARCH 17: Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards, 86, announces his run for U.S. Congress at the Belle of Baton Rouge Hotel on March 17, 2014 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Edwards spent eight years in prision following a felony conviction arising from the licensing of riverboat casinos in his fourth term as Governor. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)

In this week’s installment of our District Profile series, we turn to Louisiana’s Sixth congressional district where nine Republicans (including a dance instructor who calls herself the Sarah Palin of the South), three Democrats (including an ex-con) and one Libertarian will be on the ballot to fill the seat of Congressman Bill Cassidy, who is running for Senate.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Washington Post App: Reversing the Paper’s Problems?

Pictured is the Washington Post building on August 5, 2013. (Win McNamee/AFP/Getty Images)

In the past several years, The Washington Post has suffered serious financial troubles and a seeming inability to assert its place in the digital world.

But David Carr of The New York Times thinks that The Washington Post is headed back to its Watergate-reporting glory days. He says that Jeff Bezos, the Post’s new owner and founder and CEO of Amazon.com, is giving the paper the resources it needs to thrive.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Airport Screenings To Begin For Ebola

The government plans to begin taking the temperatures of travelers from West Africa arriving at five U.S. airports as part of a stepped-up response to the Ebola epidemic.

Defense One tech editor Patrick Tucker tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that temperature screening and blood tests at airports are not an effective ways to stop people with Ebola from entering the U.S.

Tucker says the best method may be to do what we do stop terrorists from getting on a plane: background and contacts screening.

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