Here & Now

Weekdays 9-11 a.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

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Chinese Action Musical Comes To Denver

1 hour ago

A new Chinese action musical is holding its U.S. premiere on a stage in Denver. “Terracotta Warriors 3D” is a live performance piece centered around the story of China’s first emperor, who was buried with an army of clay soldiers. It’s part of an effort to spread Chinese culture around the world. Corey Jones from Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio reports.

This week, students arriving at Old Dominion University could see banners hanging from a Sigma Nu fraternity house. “Rowdy and fun, hope your baby girl is ready for a good time,” and “freshman daughter drop off.” The signs were criticized for mocking sexual violence against women, and sparked national outrage.

A former student at St. Paul’s School, an elite New Hampshire prep school, is on trial for allegedly raping a freshman girl two days before graduation in 2014. The alleged assault is suspected to be part of a longstanding hook-up tradition at the Concord, New Hampshire, boarding school. Paige Sutherland from Here & Now contributor New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

On TV, Katrina Has Gone Mostly Unseen

Aug 26, 2015

TV journalism was crucial to the country seeing what was and wasn’t being done to help the survivors of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Since then, however, there has not been a focus – in either fictionalized television or in journalism – on the underlying issues that were uncovered.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss why issues like poverty and class are generally unattractive to many TV audiences.

Update 2:23 p.m.: Franklin County Sheriff Bill Overton says the suspect in the shooting has died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Virginia State Police say that as they were pursuing the suspect in an on-air fatal shooting, he ran off the road and crashed, and was found suffering from a gunshot wound.

Virginia State Police spokeswoman Corinne Geller said Wednesday that the suspect is being treated for life-threatening injuries.

Mount Everest Reopened To Climbers

Aug 26, 2015

Japanese mountaineer Nobukazu Kuriki is heading up Everest. This week he became the first person granted a permit to climb the mountain since a 7.8 magnitude earthquake devastated much of Nepal in April.

After four attempts, Kuriki hopes to reach the top. He also says he hopes to send a message that the mountain is safe for climbers.

Seven-time summiter Peter Athans says Nepal needs tourists now more than ever. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

For decades, sandwiches have been the go-to food for picnics and school lunches. In the 1950’s, various trade organizations declared August to be National Sandwich Month. Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares a few of her favorites with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

As we mark the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast and killed more than 1,800 people in August of 2005, Here & Now listens back to some of the memorable moments from the storm and the news coverage.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Napa Valley Wine Train is facing backlash, after members of women’s book club said they were kicked off the train over the weekend because of their race. All but one of the 11 book club members kicked off the train was African-American. The train company says the group was being too noisy. Danielle Belton of The Root discusses the story with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that most U.S. middle and high schools start the school day too early, before 8:30 a.m.

Lead author Dr. Anne Wheaton says if teens don’t get enough sleep, they are more prone to not getting enough exercise and engaging in risky behavior like drinking alcohol. She cites a recommendation from the National Sleep Foundation that 14 to 17-year-olds need eight to 10 hours of sleep a night.

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