Here & Now

Weekdays 9-11 a.m.
Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

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NPR Story
11:58 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Young Singers Beat The Odds To Sing With National Honor Choir

Fifth graders (from left) Claire Thompson, Sophia Porreca and Tamilyn Lechuga all attend Kunsmiller Creative Arts Academy. (Courtesy Denver Public Schools)

Tonight and tomorrow, 1,200 students from across the country will perform with the National Children’s Honor Choir in Salt Lake City.

It’s one of the most prestigious junior choruses in the country. Among them will be three students from a school in southwest Denver, where more than three-quarters of the kids qualify for free or reduced lunch.

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NPR Story
11:58 am
Fri February 27, 2015

'Star Trek' Star Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

Actor Leonard Nimoy arrives at the premiere of Paramount Pictures' 'Star Trek Into Darkness' at the Dolby Theatre on May 14, 2013 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 12:36 pm

Leonard Nimoy, known around the world as Spock on “Star Trek,” died this morning at age 83. Nimoy, of course, was more than just Spock. He was a poet, a photographer and a musician. But he touched a chord as the brainy, unflappably logical, half-human half-Vulcan Spock.

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NPR Story
11:55 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Remote Mexican Villages Build Their Own Cell Networks

Peter Bloom of Rhizomatica meets with the authorities in Tlahuitoltepec Mixe, Oaxaca. Rhizomatica is a non-profit group in Oaxaca city that has helped 16 remote villages install and operate their own cell phone networks. (rhizomatica.org)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 12:17 pm

Cellphones are just about everywhere these days. But in remote, rural places the key ingredient – a cell network – is often missing. In the U.S., long-distance users pay a surcharge into the Universal Service Fund, which the government uses to pay network operators to provide affordable phone access in rural or low-income areas.

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NPR Story
11:55 am
Thu February 26, 2015

For A Glimpse At A GOP Presidential Hopeful, Head To CPAC

Volunteers walk by a stand at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at National Harbor, Maryland, outside Washington, D.C. on February 26, 2015. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 1:03 pm

The Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC, usually attracts the country’s most die-hard conservative activists. This year it’s also attracting nearly a dozen – depending on how you count – Republican presidential hopefuls for 2016.

NPR’s Don Gonyea is there and joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about who’s at CPAC to show off their stuff, and how they might try to win hearts and minds.

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NPR Story
11:55 am
Thu February 26, 2015

That Political Bumper Sticker Could Cost You Your Job

(kenudigit/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 7:17 am

‘Tis the season to speculate who’s going to run for president, who will make it through the primary, who will ultimately end up in Oval Office.

But before you slap a bumper sticker on your car, or hang a political cartoon at work, you might want to think twice. Because it turns out that either of those could get you fired. And in most states in the country, labor laws will not protect you.

While federal law bars employers from firing workers for race, religion or gender, there is no protection for freedom of political speech or action.

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NPR Story
11:57 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Senate Dems Agree To GOP Plan To Fund Homeland Department

Senate Democrats on Wednesday signed onto a Republican plan to fund the Homeland Security Department without the immigration provisions opposed by President Barack Obama. The announcement by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid put the Senate on track to pass the bill as a partial agency shutdown looms Friday at midnight.

The House’s response was uncertain. Earlier Wednesday, House Republicans reacted tepidly at best to the plan from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who proposed decoupling the issue of DHS funding from immigration.

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NPR Story
11:57 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Will Elizabeth Warren's Populist Message Shape 2016?

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during a hearing before Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee February 10, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 3:51 pm

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is an unusual rookie politician. The freshman senator has a seat at the leadership table and a loudspeaker many veteran politicians would envy. Her fans are hoping she’ll run for president in 2016, but Warren insists she’s not. So what is Senator Warren’s emerging role in the Democratic Party? From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Asma Khalid of WBUR reports.

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NPR Story
11:57 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Refinery Strike Continues Into Fourth Week

Members of the United Steelworkers Union and other supporting unions picket outside the BP refinery on February 10, 2015 in Whiting, Indiana. Workers at the BP refinery walked off the job Sunday morning after failing to reach an agreement on a new contract. They join workers at other oil refineries and plants in the first nationwide refinery strike since 1980. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

A nationwide oil refinery strike continued this week and expanded to 15 plants. The United Steelworkers union organized the walkout, after the union’s contract with oil companies expired.

One of the latest refineries to be impacted is the Motiva Enterprises refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, the largest of its kind in the country. CNN’s Maggie Lake joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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NPR Story
11:38 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Uber's New Turf: Mid-Sized Cities

Des Moines, Iowa, is one of the mid-sized cities where Uber is expanding. (Ron Reiring/Wikimedia Commons)

The car-for-hire service Uber has been elbowing its way into big cities across the country, sparking controversies with taxis and regulators.

Last month, the San Francisco-based company raised $1.6 billion in financing, which it is using to fund international expansion.

Closer to home, the company is setting its sights on mid-sized cities, looking to expand its market into areas where taxi service is not as much a part of the culture.

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NPR Story
11:38 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Revisiting Ransom Riggs' Latest 'Peculiar Children' Book

Ransom Riggs‘ novel “Hollow City” comes out in paperback today. It’s the second of his “Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children” series about children with supernatural powers.

Like its predecessor, “Hollow City” is based on vintage black and white photographs that Riggs finds and writes stories around.

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