Here & Now

Weekdays 9-11 a.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

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The Chinese and Russian navies are conducting military exercises in the South China Sea, which has been the subject of territorial disputes between China and its Southeast Asian neighbors.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Stephen Nagy of the International Christian University of Tokyo about whether they are risking a provocation.

Interview Highlights: Stephen Nagy

On what the exercises are about

Award-winning shows like “Game of Thrones” and “Veep” will be well represented at Sunday’s Emmy Awards, but some new names may collect statuettes.

“The Americans’” Keri Russell is looking for her first Emmy, as is veteran actor Courtney B. Vance, who gave a strong performance as Johnny Cochran in “American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson.” ABC’s “Black-ish” may also finally get recognized as a top comedy this year, though in an election year, Emmy voters may continue to award another solid season of “Veep.”

The top four Paralympic runners competing in the 1,500-meter final on Sunday beat the final time posted by Olympic gold medalist Matt Centrowitz Jr. at the Rio Games less than a month ago. The visually impaired runners did not use assisted technologies or guides.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Erin Strout of Runner’s World magazine about the record-breaking runners, and other standout Paralympic performances.

Managers have many reasons to say “no” to employees, but it can be difficult to work for someone who always says “no” to new ideas.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with author and employee engagement expert David Sturt about why saying “yes” more often might be better for business.

Don’t trust the polls. Trust the average. That’s the general advice from most pollsters or politicos when reading presidential predictions.

But even so, not all polls are created equal.

Results differ based on who is being selected for a poll, whether it is a national or state poll, the number of candidates on the ballot and how close the poll is to the election.

What Does The Electoral College Do?

Sep 13, 2016

Voters go to the polls on Nov. 8. But the 538 members of the Electoral College vote on Dec. 19.

They’re supposed to follow the popular vote, but there’s always a chance a few might not. And what happens if Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are tied?

Political scientist Kyle Dell joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young for a refresher on the Electoral College, and how members of Congress might break a potential tie.

Interview Highlights: Kyle Dell

On the Electoral College’s function

The world’s wilderness areas have experienced catastrophic losses in the past two decades, according to a new study published Friday in the journal “Current Biology.”

Comparing current maps with those from the 1990s, researchers concluded that more than 3.3 million square kilometers, or about one-tenth of the world’s total wilderness, has been lost, raising deep concerns about what effect that has on local economies and global climate change.

Stock markets in the U.S. were steady this morning, after closing at their lowest level since July on Friday.

The drop came after comments from Eric Rosengren, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston president, raising the expectations for a rate hike from the Federal Reserve later this year.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Jill Schlesinger about what is rattling investors.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Femi Oke of Al Jazeera English about some of the stories that are gathering steam on social media.

Jury selection began this week in the federal trial of two former top aides to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who are said to have orchestrated the traffic jam at the George Washington Bridge in 2013 known as “Bridgegate.”

Bridget Anne Kelly, Christie’s former deputy chief of staff, and Bill Baroni, a Christie appointee to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, are charged with fraud and conspiracy for allegedly planning the lane closures as an act of retribution against Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich, for not endorsing Christie’s bid for re-election.

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