Here & Now

Weekdays 9-11 a.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Here & Now website

Ways to Connect

When a natural disaster like a hurricane or tornado hits, there’s often a lot of cleanup that comes afterward. In cemeteries and historic places, the damage can extend underground if uprooted trees tear up buried artifacts or even human remains.

Emily Jones (@ejreports) of Here & Now contributor Georgia Public Broadcasting went along with a crew in Savannah that’s looking for unearthed history from last fall’s Hurricane Matthew.

In recent days, there have been revelations about ethics waivers that allow federal employees to avoid ethics rules. And there have also been ethics questions raised about President Trump’s son Eric Trump.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets an update on the Trump administration and ethics from NPR’s Marilyn Geewax (@geewaxnpr).

Sarah Mack pilots her 24-foot boat to the edge of a grassy salt marsh in southern Louisiana to bring a slow-moving, $90 billion crisis to life.

Tierra Resources, a wetland restoration company, planted plastic poles at the edge of the marsh more than a year ago. Today, those poles stand alone in the water — at least 6 feet from the shore.

“And this is a more protected site,” says Mack, who started Tierra Resources after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans. “This is not bad erosion.”

There’s a lot of talk on Wall Street about the possibility of major moves in the market Thursday because of three events: former FBI director James Comey’s testimony in Congress, elections in the U.K. and a big meeting of the European Central Bank.

The British election is Thursday, and while Prime Minister Theresa May is still ahead in the polls, support for Labour Party candidate Jeremy Corbyn has grown more than expected.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Mike Katz (@mikekatz), the Labour Party parliamentary candidate for the London suburb of Hendon.

Since the middle of the last century more than 90 percent of Isle de Jean Charles has dissolved into the southern Louisiana bayou.

The island, which is connected to the outside world by a road that’s known to flood in perfect weather, is home to a tribe of Native Americans who have fished and hunted there since the 1800s.

Those who remain are barely clinging to what’s left.

The film “Wonder Woman” took in over $100 million at the box office in its first weekend, the biggest opening ever for a female director.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with historian Jill Lepore, author of “The Secret History of Wonder Woman,” about the evolution of the comic book character and Wonder Woman’s connection to feminism.

The start of the summer TV season means the return of audience favorites, plus dozens of series premieres. Networks are experimenting with reality competitions and comedies along with a new generation of game shows.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans (@Deggans) joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd with more on what to expect from this summer’s lineup.

“I, Daniel Blake” won the top prize at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. On Friday, the gut-wrenching film about the struggles of living under England’s welfare system opens in U.S. theaters.

Howie Movshovitz (@HowieMovshovitz) of member station KUNC reports that it’s the latest from one of Britain’s greatest living filmmakers, Ken Loach.

The new Netflix movie “War Machine” features Brad Pitt as an American general commanding allied forces in Afghanistan. The film is a fictionalized account of the downfall of a real U.S. general, Stanley McChrystal, who was relieved of duty by President Obama after a less-than-flattering profile in Rolling Stone.

Pages