Here & Now

Weekdays 9-11 a.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

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A pioneering mushroom scientist and a bee expert have teamed up to help fight against a disease-carrying killer of the honeybee called the varroa mite. The scientists’ weapon of choice: mushrooms. They believe a special fungus mixture they’re working on may be able to kill parasites without harming bees. Ken Christensen of Here & Now contributor EarthFix went into the field with the scientists and reports.

Akron Loves Devo

Aug 21, 2015

A life-sized photo of the new wave band Devo was mounted over an abandoned storefront in downtown Akron, Ohio, this past week. The picture was taken in 1978, and features the band dressed in yellow hazmat suits.

This piece of public art is designed to capture the moment the band made the leap from hometown heroes to worldwide fame. From the Here & Now contributors network, David C. Barnett of WCPN brings us the story of Devo’s Rust Belt roots.

As the nation approaches the 10-year anniversary of the destruction from Hurricane Katrina, it’s worth remembering that while New Orleans felt the eye of the storm, Katrina also left 238 people dead in Mississippi, and destroyed 230,000 homes in that state.

How did the Mississippi Gulf Coast recover after such devastation, and what lingering issues still remain? Evelina Burnett of Mississippi Public Broadcasting discusses this with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd.

Faced with a shortage of primary care doctors, more and more clinics are relying on nurse practitioners to fill the gap. But that creates another gap, in the level of training providers bring to the job.

As Rowan Moore Gerety of Northwest Public Radio reports, residency programs, once reserved for physicians, are popping up for nurse practitioners as well.

Gawker, Salon, and Vice have all decided to unionize their editorial staffs this summer. Buzzfeed’s owner, however, says collective bargaining wouldn’t be right for his company.

NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about why unions are making their way into new media, and whether Jonah Peretti is right to say unions wouldn’t be good for his employees.

Des Moines Makes The List

Aug 20, 2015

It seems like every time you log onto Facebook someone has shared a link to one of those lists that rank cities in categories. “The 10 Happiest Cities for Young Professionals” or “America’s Best Cities for Barbecue.” Why are these lists so popular? And more importantly, what’s their impact? Iowa Public Radio’s Sarah Boden went in search of answers.

Is Breakfast Really So Important?

Aug 20, 2015

The debate rages on: Is breakfast the most important meal of your day, or can you skip it without dire consequences? NPR food and nutrition correspondent Allison Aubrey explains that the answer isn’t simple. Although most people do report eating breakfast, the health benefits depend on what you eat and who you are. She discusses the research with Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins.

Guest

KCRW DJ Chris Douridas joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to share some new summer music. There’s a bit of country and bluegrass with Pokey LaFarge and the Kiwi singer Marlon Williams. There are also some deep electro tracks with Maximum Balloon and the Flemish group Waar is Ken?

Security experts are telling multiple news outlets today that the leaked names of Ashley Madison customers appear to be real. Ashley Madison markets itself with the tagline, "Life is short. Have an affair." About one month ago it was reported that the site had been hacked and the names and credit card numbers of 37 million customers could be posted online.

The recent New York Times article on the work environment at Amazon has put a spotlight on the culture of the competitive workplace and the increasing difficulty of attaining a satisfying work-life balance.

Amazon culls its workforce annually, based in part on performance reviews from coworkers. It’s a data-driven system that could be coming to more companies soon.

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