Here & Now

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  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

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Thousands of women in the military report being sexually assaulted each year. In fact, the number is rising.

When those women return to civilian life, they might seek counseling at a local Veterans Affairs clinic. In Nashville, there’s now a kind of supplemental therapy that’s distinctly Music City. It’s a program that pairs survivors of sexual assault with songwriters, who help put their stories to music.

Emily Siner of Here & Now contributor WPLN in Nashville explains more about what goes on inside this particular Veterans Affairs center.

In the current era of data analytics, companies are tracking people’s footsteps, diet, budget and browsing history. Now, some companies are starting to measure the proficiency of their workers.

Humanyze, a Boston-based company, builds devices to analyze things like how an employee talks, with whom they’re talking, body movement and location. Its goal is to give employers data that can improve the efficiency of a company.

Goldman Sachs Ends BRIC Investment Fund

Nov 9, 2015

Goldman Sachs recently shut down its BRIC investment fund, and it’s being called the end of an era. The investment banking firm explained the decision, saying in an SEC filing that it “does not expect the [fund] to experience significant asset growth in the foreseeable future.”

A historic election is set to take place this weekend in one of the world’s most closed countries. Myanmar, also known as Burma, has been under military rule for more than half a century. But on Sunday, it will hold its first contested national election in 25 years.

Myanmar has been slowly moving towards this moment since 2010, when the longtime military dictatorship began loosening its control over the country.

Spanish-born Salvador Salort-Pons, 45, has moved from curator to new director at the Detroit Institute of Arts, an institution that helped Detroit emerge from bankruptcy and is now looking to grow its operating endowment by $400 million.

Comedian and actress Margaret Cho this week took to social media to talk about a difficult experience from when she was younger. She says that she was raped by an acquaintance and raped and sexually abused by a family member over a period of time.

She started the hashtag #12DaysofRage and is also coming out with a song and video called “I Want to Kill My Rapist.”

Donald Trump has blurred the line between entertainment and politics for much of this year’s presidential primary season. He holds up his TV ratings the same way he touts his Republican poll standings, which are either first or second nationally, depending on the poll.

NBC is using Trump’s magnetic draw to its advantage on Saturday; giving him hosting reigns for Saturday Night Live. No other serious contender in a primary has ever hosted before, so this raises ethical questions.

Experience what it’s like to live on the Navajo Nation, even if you’re not a native. That’s what one Navajo entrepreneur is advertising. She offers a bed and breakfast, Navajo style. It’s peaceful and rustic. And it’s missing some creature comforts that many would expect from a typical B&B. But as Laurel Morales reports for Fronteras Desk, at Here & Now contributor station KJZZ, it’s booked solid for months.

New details on the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal are emerging as the Obama administration released a full draft of the agreement Thursday.

Vietnam will extend labor concessions to its workers as part of the deal. The plan would give laborers in the communist country the ability to strike and unionize.

The U.S. Congress now has a window to review the pact. NPR’s Marilyn Geewax discusses the details of the deal with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

The Lake County Sheriff’s office says Fox Lake police lieutenant Charles Gliniewicz staged his own death.

Investigators looking into Gliniewicz’s death say he had embezzled thousand of dollars over seven years from the Fox Lake Police Explorers club, using the money on mortgage payments, travel and adult websites.

Gliniewicz’s death on Sept. 1, drew national attention, after it was believed he was shot in the line of duty. It prompted a manhunt for suspects.

The Associated Press contributed reporting.