Here & Now

Weekdays 9-11 a.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

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A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the last woolly mammoths died out because they didn’t have enough water to drink. That happened about 6,000 years ago, on St. Paul Island off the coast of Alaska.

Russell Graham, a professor in Penn State’s Department of Geosciences, joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the new finding.

Two weeks of party conventions and back-to-back speeches meant to revel in political ideals also highlighted something else: language.

Derek Thompson of The Atlantic writes that unlike past political cycles, current Republicans and Democrats speak with different sets of vocabulary, even as they discuss the same policy issues.

Shawn Johnson was the sprightly 16-year-old gymnast who charmed the country at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, winning a gold on the balance beam, and silver medals for the team, all-around and floor exercise competitions.

For a teenager from Des Moines, Iowa, it sounds like a dream true. But those first years at home after the Games weren’t easy. Johnson struggled with the constant spotlight, and, for a time, with an eating disorder.

The Divine Lorraine Hotel is one of Philadelphia’s most prominent examples of blight.

The late Victorian complex was built in 1894 as a stylish set of apartments. When it changed hands 54 years later, it became the first racially integrated hotel in the city and a symbol of pride and luxury.

The four-day Democratic National Convention put Philadelphia in the spotlight. The world learned of its historic roots, the Liberty Bell, and the city’s food. But what visitors may not have seen are the neighborhoods that make Philadelphia the largest city with the most deep poverty in the country.

Aaron Moselle of Here & Now contributor WHYY explains how it happened.

Pope Francis’s visit to Poland this week celebrates the country’s rich Catholic heritage, but it also highlights tensions with the Polish Catholic culture and the current right-wing government’s anti-immigrant stance.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with historian Piotr H. Kosicki, a University of Maryland professor and a former scholar at the Wilson Center, about Poland’s evolving relationship with Europe and the world.

Farmers are watching the election closely, looking at issues like immigration which could affect farm labor. Today, a look at the dangers of farming.

According to the International Labor Organization, nearly half of the 335,000 workplace fatalities around the world every year take place in agriculture settings.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with David Griffiths and his wife Edie, founders of Seven Stars Farm Organic Yogurt, about the hay bale accident that left him quadriplegic.

Prosecutors dropped the remaining charges against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray. The move comes after three other officers were not convicted.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Jennifer Ludden, NPR national correspondent, about the case.

Guest

Jennifer Ludden, NPR national correspondent. She tweets @jenniferludden.

There was one shooting every six hours on average last year in Philadelphia. In the past 10 years, more than 14,500 shootings occurred, with at least 2,600 killed by guns — many of whom were black residents.

While some see the numbers as a reason to increase gun control, others see things differently.

Yuri Zalzman of North Philadelphia’s The Gun Range and Maj Toure of the activist group Black Guns Matter have come together to try to find solutions.

Donald Trump ended his speech at the Republican National Convention last night with the phrase that has become the central one of his campaign: “Make America great again.”

When people use that phrase, what era are they referring to? Here & Now producer Chris Ballman asked Republican delegates that question outside the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

When you hear “make America great again,” what era comes to mind? Let us know with a comment below.

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