Here & Now

Weekdays 9-11 a.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

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For this week’s DJ Session, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson sits down with DJ Luis “Speedy” Gonzalez, who hosts “Latin Jazz and Salsa” on WMNF in Tampa, Florida. He shares new Latin and salsa sounds, including artist Tony Succar’s new tribute to Michael Jackson, and the Afro-Cuban funk group Palo.

Freightliner, a division of Daimler, has been given a license to test its self-driving tractor-trailer truck in Nevada. The trucks will have a driver in the driver’s seat to take control when the truck is in cities, but the idea is that on limited-access interstates it could self-drive. CNN’s Maggie Lake discusses the implications with Here & Now's Robin Young.

Guest

Let's Have Dinner And Talk About Death

May 6, 2015

The last time you went to a dinner party, you probably didn’t talk about death, but that’s the focus of conversation at a growing number of tables. It’s part of an international movement called “Death Over Dinner.” The goal is talk about important questions before it’s too late. In San Francisco, Lesley McClurg of Capital Public Radio joined a recent gathering of guests with ties to Silicon Valley.

When David Letterman makes his last wisecrack as host of the “Late Show” on May 20th, he’ll be concluding an accomplished 33-year career that included more than 6,000 late-night broadcasts and almost 20,000 guest appearances.

His shows received 16 Emmy Awards awards and a staggering 112 Emmy Award nominations.

NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the host’s legacy and final weeks.

What Is Cinco De Mayo?

May 5, 2015

Today is Cinco de Mayo (the fifth of May), a Mexican holiday traditionally celebrated with colorful costumes, singing, dancing and lots of drinking.

The day is well known in U.S., but as we sip on margaritas, do we know exactly what we’re celebrating?

The holiday commemorates a Mexican victory over the French in Puebla on May 5, 1862.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch is visiting Baltimore today to meet with local leaders, as things are slowly getting back to normal in the city.

The city has lifted its curfew, National Guard Troops are pulling out and businesses, including CVS, are saying they will rebuild.

But tensions are still running high in parts of the city, as evidenced yesterday after police arrested a black man. Rumors were running rampant that police had shot the man in the back as he was running away.

The United States says climate change will be front and center on the agenda of the Arctic Council – the intergovernmental body made up of eight countries with territories in the region.

The U.S. is now chair of the council, which includes Russia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.

Founded in 1996, the council’s purpose is to promote cooperation in the region. They are not policymakers, but do advise governments on issues related to the Arctic.

Today is the 45th anniversary of the killing of four students by National Guard troops on the campus of Kent State University in Ohio during a rally to protest U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

The cultural divisions of those times have been examined in numerous books and documentaries, but sometimes history leaves its mark in other ways.

Comcast reported today that its total revenue rose 2.6 percent in the quarter that ended March 31, surpassing analyst expectations.

The earnings report comes after Comcast abandoned its plans to merge with Time Warner Cable, amid news of increased scrutiny from regulators over the deal.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at Comcast’s earnings with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News.

David Wildstein, a former Port Authority official in New Jersey, pleaded guilty today to playing a role in shutting down lanes of traffic during rush hour on the George Washington Bridge, a move taken as political retribution against the Mayor of Fort Lee, New Jersey, who refused to support New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s bid for re-election.

Wildstein was a known Christie ally, as well as one of the governor’s childhood friends.

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