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We've all heard that an aspirin a day can keep heart disease at bay. But lots of Americans seem to be taking it as a preventive measure, when many probably shouldn't.

In a recent national survey, more than half the adults who were middle age or older reported taking an aspirin regularly to prevent a heart attack or stroke. The Food and Drug Administration only recommends the drug for people wh have already experienced such an event or are at extremely high risk.

Comcast Calls Off Merger With Time Warner

Apr 24, 2015
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Lost Siblings Find Each Other On Dating App

Apr 24, 2015
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Tales Of Environmental Activism

Apr 24, 2015
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A tiny independent movie has been picked by one of Hollywood's biggest moguls to promote his latest venture. Robert L. Johnson created BET and now, the Urban Movie Channel — an online channel that's being called the black Netflix.

The first original film it has acquired is a gay interracial romance set in the Deep South. In Blackbird, the main character Randy is in high school. Everyone thinks he's gay, and they're totally fine with it.

Randy, 18, is fervently religious. Even though his best friend is gay, Randy's in denial about his own sexuality.

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Beneath a gray sky, rainwater had collected in a hole in the ground where Rana Plaza once stood, creating a small, murky pond. Rubble and pieces of steel bars surrounded the edge of the water. It was hard to believe that this small lot, steps away from a busy main road, was once home to an eight-story building with thousands of garment workers.

The nondescript place did not look like the site of the world's worst garment factory disaster. Two years ago on April 24, Rana Plaza collapsed, killing more than 1,100 people and injuring 2,500.

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