BRING Recycling

Angela Kellner

Saying she plans to do "more being and less doing" in her retirement, Julie Daniel has passed the crown of reduce, reuse, recycle to her successor after nearly 10 years as the Executive Director of BRING. After a national search the Board of Directors picked staff member Carolyn Stein to replace Daniel. Stein has been with BRING since 2008, serving first as Education Coordinator, then moving to her most recent position as Manager of the RE:think Business program, which she developed and launched in 2010.

Meyer Memorial Trust

One of the largest private foundations in Oregon awarded over $9.5 million dollars in February alone. Starting today, the Meyer Memorial Trust is suspending its programs to refocus its giving.

The Meyer Memorial Trust was created in 1982 by the estate of grocery magnate Fred Meyer, but is not connected to the grocery store. Kimberly Wilson is with the Trust. She says the seven-nine month hiatus will help the organization be more directed:

greatbuildings.com

There will be no wrecking ball at Eugene’s City Hall. The structure is being disassembled. This week, western red cedar slats and some heavy paving stones are being removed.

The pavers that made up the concrete plaza outside the Council Chamber are being transported to BRING Recycling. Each paver weighs over 100 pounds and more than 2,000 of them have already been moved. BRING’s Executive Director, Julie Daniel, says they’re prepared to store the blocks, plus whatever other cabinets, fixtures and fittings they can take from the building.

www.bringrecycling.org

Passive solar. LED lighting. Urban gardens. This weekend, BRING Recycling's Home and Garden Tour in Eugene highlights sustainable design and low-impact construction.

Julie Daniel is the Executive Director of BRING. She says the tour started as a showcase for re-used materials. Over six years, it's expanded:

Daniel: "There's more than one new building on the tour this year. Some are still under construction. There's a net zero home, which is a home that uses no energy, it actually returns more energy than it uses to the grid, including charging their electric car."

Merkley
Tiffany Eckert

Last week, the US Supreme Court heard “Hobby Lobby vs Sebelius.” The case could allow for-profit companies to deny health insurance coverage to women for birth control and other services if-- the CEO has a moral objection. Today, Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley, business owners and women’s health advocates called on the land’s highest court to protect women’s health care.

Nearly fifty years ago, a landmark Supreme Court case ended state bans on access to birth control, ruling it was protected in the Constitution as a “right to privacy.”