Crime & Law

Crime, Law & Justice

Oregon Innocence Project

Until now, Oregon was the only state in the country without a program dedicated to investigating claims of wrongful conviction. The “Oregon Innocence Project” aims to provide a way to help.

Before the late 1990’s, the idea someone could serve time for a crime they didn’t commit was unusual. As DNA evidence became admissible, challenges to wrongful convictions grew.

Aliza Kaplan is a co-founder of the Oregon Innocence Project.

The Eugene Police and Police Commission are taking a look at whether bias or profiling plays a role in how cops approach their work. There's a public forum Thursday evening for people to voice their concerns.

The Police Commission is drafting a policy on bias-based policing policy. At the same time EPD is developing new methods for collecting data on contact between police and the public. Carter Hawley is a Management Analyst for the Eugene Police Department. She says there's a perception that bias based on race, gender, age or other factors plays a role in police activity.

Paul Carter, Register Guard

Johan Gillette was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison with no possibility of parole. Gilllette was convicted in a jury trial of aggravated murder in the deaths of his father James Gillette and Anne Dhu McLucas. A court settlement took the sentencing out of the jury's hands.

Rachael McDonald

Lane County's District Attorney says lack of law enforcement capacity contributed the release of a man accused of killing two people over the last few weeks.  

Eugene Police arrested Ricardo Cheney on drug and firearms charges on March 6th.  The DA's office said it chose not to file charges because the crime involved no violence or threat of violence and fell below the current local threshold for prosecution.

Reporter Reflects On Murder Trial

Mar 21, 2014

Wednesday, a jury convicted Johan Gillette on two counts of aggravated murder and one count of intentional murder in the deaths of his father James Gillette and Anne Dhu McLucas. Next week, they decide on sentencing. Throughout the trial, the Register Guard coverage has been high profile. Their reporter Greg Bolt spoke with KLCC's Tripp Sommer.

Rachael McDonald

Last Friday, police deployed a SWAT team to arrest a member of the Barrio Los Padrinos criminal street gang in downtown Eugene. The suspect was accused of sexual assault and believed to be armed. Earlier that day, KLCC's Rachael McDonald spoke with EPD Detective Greg Harvey. She asked about gang graffiti and what's going on with gangs in Eugene / Springfield.

Harvey: "So this little walkway goes between 2nd street and the Pioneer Parkway and it’s a heavily trafficked area."

Oregon Court of Appeals Judge Joel DeVore spoke with KLCC’s Claude Offenbacher this week in the KLCC Studios.  Judge DeVore, a Eugene resident with a U of O law degree and a background in civil litigation, was named to the Court by Governor Kitzhaber five months ago.  He fills one of three new positions on the Court created in 2012. What, he was asked,  is the role of the state’s Court of Appeals?

Chris Potter

In an effort to reduce costly jail sentences, the city of Eugene is planning to establish a Community Court for certain offenses. City officials are asking residents to help choose which low-level crimes should be routed through the new system. 

Eugene Municipal Court Administrator Cheryl Stone became interested in this court model while doing research on high rates of failure to appear and recidivism. She asked herself this question:

Identity Theft Can Be Prevented

Feb 21, 2014

Identity theft is when someone poses as you to commit a crime. According to police, it happens several times *a day in Eugene. Victims may not know of the offense until major damage has already been done.

Stealing another person's identity is a serious crime. And, when caught, perpetrators can expect to see the inside of a jail cell.  This week, (Tuesday 2/18) a 35-year old Eugene man was sentenced to 15 years in prison for breaking into vehicles and rummaging through trash to find personal information.

Jes Burns

Incarcerated mothers have a new place to re-connect with their kids after they get out of prison.  Thursday, the re-entry services group "Sponsors" cut the ribbon on a new house in Eugene that will provide a place for families to get a new start.

Each of the five modest-sized bedrooms has its own bathroom and one wall painted a bright-cheery color.  In about a week, women will begin moving into Bothy Cottage in the Jefferson-Westside neighborhood.  Each will be joined by up to two of their children.

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