Disasters & Accidents

Oregon Department of Forestry

The Yellow Point Fire, burning about 25 miles west of Cottage Grove is now 45% contained.  The Oregon Department of Forestry says crews have run more than 25 miles of hose.  Water is being distributed to the line.  Spokeswoman Shirl Fredenburg says crews are working hard to wet the area around the fire ahead of a forecast red flag weather warning.

 “Low humidity and dry, hot weather… that could be a factor.  But they have high expectations that they’ll keep it under control.”

Inciweb

Firefighters in Oregon are bracing for dry, hot weather expected back in the region Thursday and through the weekend.

The Deception Complex of fires outside Oakridge is 64 percent contained. It's burned more than 48 hundred acres. Fire spokeswoman Sara Saarloos says crews have made good progress mopping up containment lines. They're preparing for fire weather.

Saarloos: "With that warming and drying trend we'll start seeing an increase in fire behavior. We do still have some fire in the interior of the Deception Fire."

Oregon Department of Forestry

Smoke from regional wildfires drifted into the Willamette Valley this weekend, causing hazy conditions. The air quality may be affected through mid-week.

The smell of smoke was strong in the South Willamette Valley this weekend. Air quality monitors were at moderate for Eugene /Springfield and up to unhealthy for Oakridge.  Sarah Saarloos is with the Deception Complex of Fires:

Corvallis Gazette-Times

The Yellow Point Fire, which broke out Friday afternoon, is roughly 220 acres. It's located about 25 miles west of Cottage Grove. No homes or structures are threatened and the cause of the fire is under investigation.

The blaze is burning in timber and logging slash in a remote area near the historic 1966 Oxbow Fire. Due to excessive traffic, smoky conditions and narrow roads, the public is encouraged to stay clear of the area. A late-night wildfire that tore through brush near Corvallis was extinguished Saturday morning after it forced the evacuation of more than 200 homes.

@FOX12Oregon via twitter

10:25 AM UPDATE:

Firefighters have the fire 70% contained at 3:00 a.m., and the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) used a bulldozer to fully contain the fire by 5:00 a.m.

www.inciweb.nwcg.gov

The Deception Complex fire near Oakridge and a small fire in the Coast Range are keeping almost a thousand firefighters busy.

A fire in the Cape Perpetua scenic area was reported Monday evening. As of Tuesday a 20-person crew was working to contain the half-acre blaze, which is in a drainage of Cummins Creek. According to officials, there are no closures. The cause of the fire is unknown and will be investigated.

Inciweb

The Deception Creek Complex of wildfires in the Willamette National Forest near Oakridge is now 55 percent contained. It has burned more than 2,200 acres.

Department of Forestry

The Deception Complex Fire burning west of Oakridge is now 55% contained. The 2,000 acre collection of wildfires was buffeted by strong winds late Friday causing the fire to burn near ridge tops, but ground lines held. The Deception Creek Mobile Home Park, the Middle Fork Ranger Station, and some houses along the La Duke Road remain on a level 2 evacuation notice.

www.inciweb.nwcg.gov

The Deception Complex fire near Oakridge is now 45 percent contained. However, it moved west Thursday night, causing some closures for the long weekend.

Part of the Cottage Grove Ranger District is under an emergency closure. An area southeast of Forest Service Road 17 is closed from Spirit Falls to the divide. Pam Sichting is with the U.S. Forest Service. She says archery season opens this weekend, and bow hunters should stay current with fire updates:

Summer is ending, but fire season in the Northwest is still with us. The Oregon Gulch fire was southern Oregon’s largest so far this season, blackening nearly 56 square miles of southern Oregon and northern California. Several homes were lost, others were saved and a rural mountain community came face-to-face with the reality of sudden danger and loss. In Ashland, Jefferson Public Radio’s Liam Moriarty traces the path the fire took as it marked the lives of those it touched.

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