drought

City of Eugene

Citing severe drought conditions, the Eugene City Council has banned fireworks in the south hills. 

Facing a forecast in the 90’s through the holiday weekend, councilors held an emergency meeting Wednesday.  The result was a unanimous vote to ban all fireworks within City limits south of 18th Avenue and all areas east of Agate Street.

Chris Pryor: “But I don’t want to support anything that doesn’t have teeth behind it.”

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High temperatures and drought conditions in Oregon mean campers need to be extra vigilant this year to prevent forest fires. Willamette National Forest officials are worried about fireworks during the upcoming 4th of July holiday.

Ken Gregor - Incident Commander

Updated Sunday 2:00 pm:

Lemolo Lake Resort and the Forest Service Campgrounds at Poole Creek and East Lemolo remain open.  Bunker Hill, Inlet, and Crystal Springs  Campgrounds are closed to protect public safety.

The Bunker Hill Complex is located 15 miles north of Diamond Lake.  The fire complex consists of one larger fire called the Bunker Hill Fire and several small fires all burning within the Umpqua National Forest.

http://www.eweb.org/ggg.htm

With temperatures reaching between 90 and 100, the Eugene Water and Electric Board is asking customers to voluntarily reduce water use. Oregon, like many parts of the western U.S., is currently in a drought and experienced a record low snow pack this year. EWEB Spokesman Joe Harwood isn't anticipating any mandated water restrictions, like in certain parts of California.

Harwood: "We don't think that's going to happen, and that's why we're taking this voluntarily approach because just because you can use water, doesn't mean you always should."

Oregon Water Resources Department

Oregon Governor Kate Brown has declared a drought emergency in Sherman County due to a lack of snow pack and low water conditions. This brings the number of Oregon counties under drought emergency to twenty. Last year, only ten counties had the designation.

Gov. Brown says the signs are already apparent in many of Oregon's rivers, streams, fields and yards.

Jes Burns / Earthfix

You’ve probably heard by now that reservoirs in the Northwest are low on water, but you may be surprised just how dry they are.

Many lakes levels are lower this spring than they’ve been in 30 years. This is especially true at some of the most popular recreation lakes.
 

The marina at Howard Prairie Lake is high and dry. The docks tilt awkwardly this way and that, stranded on the uneven lake bottom.

Steve Lambert: “Normally, on a year when the lake is full, we’d most likely have 15 to 16 feet of water above our heads. So, yeah, it’s a little pasture right now.”

Douglas Forest Protective Association

The federal government is warning this could be a dangerous and costly wildfire season in the west, due in part to drought and climate change.

The Douglas Forest Protective Association oversees 1.6-million acres of land in Douglas County. Fire Prevention Specialist Kyle Reed says their 10-year average is about 90 fires a year. He says they're already one-third of the way there.

KMTR

Oregon Governor Kate Brown announced drought emergencies in 8 additional counties Friday, including Lane.  Many reservoirs in Lane County are only half full.

Last week, Governor Kate Brown declared drought emergency in two more Oregon counties—Wheeler and Baker. Currently, more than half of the state is eligible for emergency federal aid—and it's only April. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert spoke with one of the state’s leading climatologists about regional drought and what the future holds.

Wikimedia Commons

California is four years into a historic drought, and water for human use is vying with the water needs of wildlife, such as threatened salmon.

In parts of northern California, an explosive and unregulated increase in marijuana cultivation is contributing to the problem. Now, a study says the impact of pot grows on fish-bearing streams is threatening their survival.

Researchers monitoring water levels in streams in Humboldt and Mendocino Counties last summer say the water impacts of cannabis grow operations are dramatic.

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