Tiffany Eckert

More people are choosing alternative ways to spend the hereafter — that includes natural burial — which means no embalming or encasement in non-biodegradable packaging. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert reports on one Eugene woman's mission to resurrect an old practice for dealing with the dead.

Tiffany Eckert

When a terminally ill patient decides to stop treatment or finds there are no other curative measures to take-- hospice is ordered. Often, the patient chooses to go home to die. As KLCC's Tiffany Eckert reports, hospice programs serve to alleviate fears and help the very sick on their final journey.

Kate McMahon

Imagine shopping around for a new home, but instead of looking for a new place to live, you are looking for a place to die. That’s the situation 83-year-old Norma Chaty found herself in. It’s hard enough to lay the groundwork for one’s own death. It’s even harder for people like Norma, who are alone and have little money. This is a story of one woman’s choice between quality and quantity of life, and what she discovered about the business of dying.

Every other day, a driver picked up Norma Chaty and took her to Portland Adventist Medical Center.