EarthFix

News Fixed on the Environment.

EarthFix is a public media partnership of KLCC, Oregon Public Broadcasting, Idaho Public Television, KCTS9 Seattle, KUOW Puget Sound Public Radio, Northwest Public Radio and Television, Jefferson Public Radio, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Portland Wants Your Rundown RV

Oct 27, 2017

The Portland Bureau of Transportation says 17 people have signed up for the city’s first free RV disposal day.

The city is covering the cost of demolishing the donated vehicles, which can run up $1,500 per vehicle, in an effort to reduce the number of leaking and hazardous RVs that are abandoned or lived in on Portland’s streets.

The city has the capacity and funding to collect up to 28 unwanted RVs. Owners of unwanted RVs have until the end of the day Friday to make an appointment online.

It's not a Dumpster fire, but could be something far more serious: A fire may be smoldering under a landfill-turned-Superfund cleanup site in southeastern Washington.

This fire is the second underground hot spot at the Pasco Sanitary Landfill — a 250-acre federal Superfund site. An earlier fire took nearly two years to extinguish.

Atlantic salmon have been entering Pacific waters for decades. Most of them have died of starvation. 

But that doesn’t mean they aren’t capable of colonizing the Northwest.

Rainier, Olympic Park Visitors May See A Large Hike In Fees

Oct 25, 2017

Next summer fees may increase at the 17 seventeen busiest national parks, including Olympic National Park and Mount Rainier.

The Park Service is asking for public comments on a new proposal that would nearly triple some entrance fees.

Next summer, if you drive into Olympic National Park or Mount Rainier, you may have to pay a new $70 entrance fee. That’s $45 dollars more than the fee now. Riding a motorcycle in may be $30 dollars more. And walking or biking in might be $20 dollars more.

Atlantic salmon have spread far and wide in Pacific Northwest waters since 160,000 of them escaped from a collapsed fish farm near Anacortes in August.

The fishy fugitives have swum 130 miles south past Tacoma, 250 miles northwest past Tofino (most of the way up Vancouver Island) and up a half-dozen rivers around the region, according to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Backers of a coal export terminal proposed in Southwest Washington are suing state regulators over their denial of a key permit needed to build the project.

Last month, the Washington Department of Ecology denied a water quality permit to the Millennium Bulk Terminals coal export project in Longview, saying the development would have too many environmental, transportation and cultural impacts.

Coming To Washington Ski Slopes: Fake Snow

Oct 24, 2017

This winter, skiers and snowboarders will see something new at Crystal Mountain — a robust $5 million snowmaking system designed to fight warmer winters in the Pacific Northwest.

Crystal’s state-of-the-art program features 36 new snow guns on the lower mountain that have the capacity to create up to 53 football fields covered in snow in a 24-hour period.

Is this the new normal for ski areas in the historically snow-rich Cascades?

Many scientists have concluded that for the planet to continue to safely support life, the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere should be kept as close as possible to a certain threshhold: 350 parts per million.

On a recent Saturday morning, a dozen people crowded a small apartment in central Vancouver, Washington. They were filling up on bacon and eggs before a day of canvassing the neighborhood.

“We got toast, we got orange juice,” Don Orange said.

In his kitchen, a stack of dirty dishes started to pile up in the sink.

“I was a short order cook when I was in high school. So, this is actually fun for me,” Orange added. “But I don’t know about the cleanup.”

Washington recyclers are worried they could soon have no place to send your discarded paper and plastics. That’s because China has decided the U.S. is letting food and garbage contaminate too much of its unwanted milk jugs and other recyclables.

China is the biggest buyer of recyclable plastic, paper and metal from the U.S. Starting next year, China will no longer take our recyclables. They say those materials are coming over with food scraps or types of plastic that can’t be recycled.

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