EarthFix

News Fixed on the Environment.

EarthFix is a public media partnership of KLCC, Oregon Public Broadcasting, Idaho Public Television, KCTS9 Seattle, KUOW Puget Sound Public Radio, Northwest Public Radio and Television, Jefferson Public Radio, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Sarah Dudas doesn't mind shucking an oyster or a clam in the name of science.

But sit down with her and a plate of oysters on the half-shell or a bucket of steamed Manila clams, and she'll probably point out a bivalve's gonads or remark on its fertility.

A Washington state board has invalidated two key permits for a $1.8 billion methanol project proposed in Kalama, Washington

In denying the permits, Washington’s Shorelines Hearings Board sided with Columbia Riverkeeper, Sierra Club and the Center for Biological Diversity, three environmental groups that appealed the permits in June.

New details about a proposal to shrink the size and loosen protections for Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument are being greeted with anger and dismay by opponents.

Oregon lawmakers could use the five-week legislative session in 2018 to tackle an issue that fell short in this year’s session.

The so-called “cap and invest” proposal would set an upper limit on the amount of fossil fuels used by companies in Oregon. It would also limit the amount imported into the state, in the case of fuel distributors.

The bill would charge a fee on companies that exceed the limit, and the money generated would be used on projects that would reduce carbon emissions in Oregon.

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Rainfall across western Oregon could oust some of the state's more than two dozen wildfires this week. But trouble still looms in the form of landslides and a possible dry-out.

The Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office says the Eagle Creek Fire is slowly growing on the southern and western edges of the fire.

As of Saturday, the fire in the Columbia River Gorge was burning more than 45,000 acres and was 32 percent contained. The fire ignited Sept. 2 and was human-caused, according to Oregon State Police.

Thousands of Northwest residents will be getting less electricity from burning coal. That’s because of a new agreement to fast-track the closure of a coal-fired power plant in Montana.

The announcement came Friday as part of a rate settlement from Puget Sound Energy. The investor-owned utility has agreed to be financially ready to close its coal plant in Montana nearly two decades ahead of what they’d originally planned.

To do this, PSE will increase customer’s electric rates by about 1 percent. That increase will be offset by a 4 percent cut in natural gas rates.

The Willamette Valley could get the most rain it's had in at least three months starting this weekend. 

As the region begins to retreat from a summer of unprecedented heat, cooler temperatures and more rain could provide relief for firefighters battling the nearly 42,000-acre Eagle Creek Fire burning in the Columbia River Gorge.

Ana Mendoza grabs her keys and walks out of her apartment at the Hacienda low-income housing complex in Portland’s Cully neighborhood.

She walks across the parking lot and unplugs one of three Honda Fit electric cars that residents and employees here can rent as needed.

It’s a little after 8 a.m., and she’s driving downtown to join a women’s leadership discussion for immigrants from Oaxaca, Mexico, that starts at 9. She doesn’t own a car, so with the car-sharing option at Hacienda she’s already saved herself about an hour of travel time over taking the bus.

Air pollution can contribute to asthma and heart disease. And it puts children at greater risk of developmental and behavioral problems.

But not everyone is equally likely to be exposed to air pollution.

While regulations and cleaner energy have meant the air’s getting a little cleaner for everyone, a new study by University of Washington researchers shows that, at every income level, people of color are still exposed to more air pollution than white people.

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