EarthFix

News Fixed on the Environment.

EarthFix is a public media partnership of KLCC, Oregon Public Broadcasting, Idaho Public Television, KCTS9 Seattle, KUOW Puget Sound Public Radio, Northwest Public Radio and Television, Jefferson Public Radio, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Before the Eagle Creek Fire in the Columbia River Gorge became the nation’s top priority wildfire, it was the Chetco Bar Fire near Brookings.

Lightning sparked the fire more than two months ago, but it's only five percent contained despite the work of 1,500 firefighters.

State Republican Representative David Brock Smith represents District 1, which includes the Kalmiopsis Wilderness Area, where the fire is burning. He says the fire has consumed nearly 180,000 acres and continues to grow.

The U.S. Forest Service received a fresh injection of wildfire fighting money in the $15.25 billion hurricane relief package signed by President Donald Trump Friday.

The House earlier in the day gave final approval to the package, which also raises the national debt limit and continues to fund the government through Dec. 8.

Oregon Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, both Democrats, helped attach the wildfire aid to the package -- a move frequently made by western lawmakers in recent years as a series of devastating forest and rangeland fires have wrecked the region. 

Of all the resources that hang in the balance as firefighters attempt to slow the growth of the Eagle Creek Fire, one stands out: the Bull Run watershed.

It’s 150 square miles of hemlock, fir and cedar trees just south of the Columbia River Gorge. The forest soaks up rain and fills the lakes and reservoirs that provide drinking water for close to 1 million people in Portland, Gresham, Beaverton and Tigard.

Emergency aid to help victims of Hurricane Harvey now also includes additional money to fight wildfires in Oregon and other western states. 

The U.S. Senate on Thursday added provisions replenishing the U.S. Forest Service's budget for the rest of this fire season. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., said it should amount to more than $100 million in additional aid. He said the money will ensure that the agency won't have to cannibalize programs aimed at making fires less likely to burn in the first place — something he said has frequently happened in the past.

It’s September, the month when monarch butterflies are at their peak in the Pacific Northwest.

These are western monarchs, not the eastern monarchs that spend their winters in Mexico. Western monarchs breed in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and eight other states and then migrate to their winter home in California.

New research shows these monarchs are disappearing even faster than their eastern cousins. Scientists are trying to figure out why.

Climate Change Is Making Smoky, Unhealthy Air More Common

Sep 7, 2017

On Wednesday, as smoke blotted out the sun across the city of Portland, about a dozen people were hiding out from the smoky heat in the air conditioned Hollywood Senior Center – one of the county's designated cooling centers for those needing relief on the hottest days of the year.

Wearing an electronic air filter around her neck, Jennifer Young, who works at the center, flipped on the larger, high-efficiency particulate  filter she brought from home to purify her work-space air.

He's survived a stabbing, a kidnapping and now a wildfire.

Oh, and he's a fish.

The Eagle Creek Fire has burned more than 30,000 acres in the Columbia River Gorge, torching trees and threatening homes.

The view of Oregon's landmark Multnomah Falls was obstructed Wednesday afternoon by a horizontal surge of water. That water, in this case, was coming from Portland and Gresham fire trucks.

There was concern over what the Eagle Creek Fire burning thousands of acres in the Columbia River Gorge could do to one of the state's iconic tourist destinations.

Fire officials said they knew they had to protect Multnomah Falls.

The Chetco Bar Fire is now burning more than 175,000 acres in the mountains near the coastal Oregon town of Brookings. The good news is that a break in the weather fueled by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lidia should give fire crews a chance to catch up.

Southwest Oregon has seen months of high temperatures and little-to-no rain, creating ripe conditions for fire starts. One of the ways fire managers determine how fire-prone an area is, is a measure called the energy release component, or ERC. 

When the Eagle Creek Fire blew up over Labor Day weekend, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said officials used every available resource to fight it.

The fire quickly doubled in size, and evacuation orders soon followed. People forced to leave the Columbia River Gorge city of Cascade Locks questioned the speed of the initial fire response.

Gov. Brown disagreed with the suggestion that firefighters were slow to react to the fast-growing blaze in the Gorge.

"Absolutely not," Brown responded. "We put all the resources we had on the fire, as quickly as possible."

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