Recorded on: April 30th, 2016

Air Date: May 2nd, 2016


Krista Dillon: University of Oregon Director of Emergency Management and Fire Prevention

Steve McGuire: Lane County Building Program Manager

Carlos Barrera: Lane County Building Program Manager

Last year's Pulitzer Prize winning New Yorker Magazine article, "The Really Big One," has awakened us to the reality that a huge disaster is in our future. We know it is inevitable, but not whether it will happen tomorrow or years in the future. How bad will it be?

The UO School of Journalism and Communication (SOJC) recently held a forum in Portland to help Oregonians prepare for "the big one." The SOJC’s “Don’t Wait for the Quake” event, hosted in partnership with OPB, convened a timely conversation about earthquake preparedness in Oregon.

As a catalyst for conversation, the forum featured five videos produced by SOJC Allen Hall Studios undergraduate students, each with its own angle on earthquake preparedness and recovery:

Karen Richards

At 10:15 today (Thursday), millions of people around the world stopped, dropped and held on as part of the Great Shakeout. Instructors and students at Lane Community College's downtown campus took part in the earthquake drill.

September’s National Preparedness Month has sparked renewed interest in earthquakes and other natural disasters in Oregon. Corvallis will host a readiness forum tonight (Thursday).

Karen Richards

A recent article in the New Yorker and the July Fourth earthquake near Springfield have generated concern for the potential of a massive Cascadia event in the Northwest. Scientists at the U of O have been working to strengthen Oregon’s early warning systems.

US Army Corps of Engineers

The Army Corps of Engineers sent inspectors to 13 Willamette Valley dams following Saturday’s magnitude 4.2 earthquake. All of them were judged to be safe.

Protocol requires dams within 75 miles of a magnitude 4.0 or greater earthquake be inspected within 24 hours.

4.2 Magnitude Earthquake Near Springfield

Jul 4, 2015
Chris Pietsch, TWITTER

A 4.2 magnitude earthquake occurred Saturday morning near Springfield. That's according to the U.S. Geological Survey. It was gaged at about 6 miles deep. One resident in Dexter who contacted KLCC reported seeing her sliding glass door move. Springfield resident, Stephanie Songchild described her experience.

Eugene and Kathmandu have had a sister city relationship for forty years. As part of local efforts to aid Nepal’s earthquake survivors, there will be a benefit on Sunday, May 24th, featuring music, dance and speakers. Proceeds will benefit the global relief project called Embracing the World. Eric Alan speaks with Arun Toké, event organizer and editor of Skipping Stones magazine.

Jay Wilson / OPB

Scientists say the northwest is due for an earthquake and tsunami as big as the one that struck Japan nearly four years ago. That could spell trouble for fire stations, schools and hospitals built with little or no seismic engineering.
Oregon Field Guide’s Ed Jahn recently traveled to Japan. He visited one hospital there that survived the 2011 quake without so much as a broken window.

Some Oregon Towns Are Prepared For Earthquake, Some Aren't

Jan 28, 2015
Kristian Foden-Vencil / OPB

Communities up and down the Oregon Coast have known about the threat of a tsunami for years. But some are better prepared than others. What are coastal communities doing to prepare?   

MaryJo Kerlin, with the Lincoln County School District, stands in the car park of the old Waldport High -- just 12 feet above sea level.

MaryJo Kerlin: "As you look around, you can see there is no high school here any longer. It's been demolished. It was demolished in a learn-to-burn exercise with our local fire departments."