Economy & Business

Economy, Business, Finance & Labor

Brian Bull / KLCC

An overnight shelter program in Eugene has expanded, relocated, and started its third year.  But as KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the Dusk to Dawn camping program still faces high demand. 

Sanity Chocolate Facebook page.

We previously reported on the Cottage Grove Business Challenge.  Organizers were looking to bestow a grand prize of $6,000 to an up-and-coming business that would help boost the local economy.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Lane County says a tentative agreement has been reached with its largest employee union, AFSCME, after nearly 8 months of negotiations and a 7 day strike.

Rachael McDonald

Lane County says it remains firm in its latest contract offer to workers represented by the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. The union has been on strike since Wednesday.

Rachael McDonald

Hundreds of Lane County workers are in their second day on strike Thursday. The union and county negotiators go back to the bargaining table Friday.

Rachael McDonald

Lane County’s largest employee union is on strike Wednesday. Negotiations between American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees, AFSCME, and county leaders went through the night but no agreement was reached by this morning.

Erik Drost / Flickr.com

Oregon’s income inequality gap has never been wider, says a group that analyzes tax and budget issues. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.  

Technology Association of Oregon

 

Tech companies are more common in Lane County than you might expect, and industry jobs are not all about programming computers. That's the message the Technology Association of Oregon wants to deliver at Thursday's tech tours in downtown Eugene.

 


Karen Richards

The fitness industry has a history of reinventing itself. Jazzercise was all the rage in the 1980s. In the 2000s, CrossFit became mainstream. One current trend is toward more targeted workouts. Here we check in with three specialized gyms opening or expanding in the Eugene / Springfield area.

Galvez family

President Trump is proposing cutting legal immigration by half.  The federal government has ramped up arrests of undocumented foreigners.  The dreamers are on hold. Yet in Oregon, immigrants continue to make their mark on the state's economy.

Recorded On: September 8, 2017

Air Date: September 11, 2017

The greater Eugene business community, especially its tech sector, has a critical shortage of skilled workers. A new local program called “Elevate Lane County” (ELC) has emerged to seize this opportunity.

Sisters Folk Festival

The wildfire smoke blanketing much of the state has prompted the cancellation of the Sisters Folk Festival in central Oregon. This is the first time the 22-year old event has been cancelled.

The wildfires burning in much of Oregon this summer have blanketed the state with unhealthy levels of smoke. This has led a growing number of outdoor events to cancel during the height of the summer tourist season. At a time when many rural Oregon communities are already struggling, the economic impact could really hurt.

Bruce Fingerhood / Flickr.com

A new competition is offering $10,000 for start-up businesses in Cottage Grove. KLCC’s Brian Bull explains. 

City of Corvallis

The City of Corvallis is now running its airport on solar power. They’ve installed and switched on a new 110-thousand kilowatt hour solar array.

A Gem in Albany

Aug 15, 2017
Jacob Lewin

After fourteen years and the efforts of nearly 400 volunteers, downtown Albany unveils a gem today. An old-fashioned carousel opens to the public. Almost everything has been built by hand...and with a lot of love.

Matthew Hurst / Flickr.com

Fair housing advocates are offering down payment assistance loans to 100 first-time home buyers in Oregon.

NEDCO, Community Lending Works, and Willamette Neighborhood Services call it Project Reinvest Down Payment Assistance. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

A former Eugene mayor turned entrepreneur is at it again. Brian Obie is launching a new venture, that he hopes will cement his place as a hospitality magnate. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports. 

Eugene Water and Electric Board plans to distribute a $5-million dividend to its customers and cut its workforce in the next year.

Roger Jones / Flickr.com

Tomorrow (July 1st) minimum wage workers across Oregon will see a hike in their hourly pay.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.  

Rachael McDonald

The Oregon Legislature approved a bill this session that authorizes ports to operate shipyards. For the Port of Toledo, it is one of many steps in efforts to restore an economic driver for the region. But, some private shipyards in Oregon fear they’ll lose millions of dollars in business.

Recorded On: June 16, 2017

Air Date: June 19, 2017

Oregon RAIN

Oregon Regional Accelerator and Innovation Network, or RAIN, helps connect entrepreneurs with resources to get their business ideas to reality. The non-profit works in Lane, Linn, Benton and Lincoln Counties. Next week, a group of start-ups on the Central Coast will graduate from RAIN’s pre-accelerator program.

Oregon Employment Department

Oregon's unemployment rate is at a record low.
The state Employment Department says the jobless rate for May was 3.6 percent, a slight drop from April's rate of 3.7.

EWEB

The State Department of Environmental Quality (or DEQ) says, with soil contaminants now removed, the city of Eugene can move ahead with development of property along the Willamette River. The 17-acre site was formerly the operations yard for Eugene Water and Electric Board.

Recorded on: June 2, 2017

Air Date: June 5, 2017

Roel Wijnants / Flickr.com

The Lane County Human Services Commission has released its annual “Homeless Point in Time” Count.  It’s based on a one-night survey of people lacking permanent residences or shelter.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports the count took place earlier this year.  

EugNet

With a federal grant, a project to create a high speed fiber network in downtown Eugene is now fully funded. The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration awarded a $1.9 million dollar grant to the city this week.

The grant, along with the city’s urban renewal money, will help Eugene realize its goal of being one of the best places in the country for internet access.

Upward of a million people are expected to flood Oregon for the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, which has cities across the state scrambling to prepare. Some, like Madras, have been planning for months. Others are just beginning.

Nestled along the John Day River is one of the smallest towns in the eclipse’s path of totality: Spray. Population: 160 people, one convenience store, one gas pump and one small food counter that closes at 6 p.m.

At her desk in the Madras city offices, Lysa Vattimo hauls out a fat binder full of documents, maps and lists. This is Madras’ solar eclipse plan.

"And it has a little bit of everything in it," Vattimo said flipping through the pages. "From port-a-potties to the public safety plan, where fire engines will be staged, where police will be staged."'

The eclipse will only last about two hours, with just two minutes of complete darkness. But those two minutes amount to months of planning for communities in the 70-mile viewing belt, otherwise known as the path of totality.

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