Election 2016

David Geitgey Sierralupe / Flickr.com

While Donald Trump and supporters celebrate his presidency this weekend, anti-Trump factions are staging nationwide protests.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr.com

This morning, Republican Donald Trump officially became the 45th President of the United States. KLCC’s Brian Bull gathered local reaction. 

Diann Morrison-Wilson

Among those attending Donald Trump’s inauguration in Washington is the Eugene woman who was his campaign manager in Lane County.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, she has high hopes for the Trump administration.  

Brian Bull

The Southern Poverty Law Center says nearly 900 hate incidents -- including those its researchers have tracked against Trump supporters -- have been reported since the election, with 33 in Oregon.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, it’s a high rate given the state population.  

Flickr.com's Gage Skidmore

During his presidential campaign, Donald Trump alternately embraced and bashed the media.  And many Trump followers criticized reporters, pushing Trump’s narrative that reporters were allied with Hillary Clinton, Democrats, and establishment Republicans.  

Flickr.com's hjl

Before Election Day, we talked with a University of Oregon journalism professor on the “Electionland” project, where social media reports on voter issues were checked and verified in real time.  KLCC's Brian Bull has this follow-up. 

Brian Bull

The contest for Eugene City Council Ward 1 finally has a winner.  Emily Semple pulled a slim margin of victory over Joshua Skov, with just over 50 percent of the vote.

Brian Bull

After a long night of uncertainty, the tight race for House District 14 is over…with Democrat Julie Fahey as the winner.

Rachael McDonald

Hundreds of South Eugene High School students walked out of class today [Wednesday] in protest of the election of Donald Trump as President. They rallied at the University of Oregon and then marched to Kesey Square.

Brian Bull

Many local Republicans excitedly watched Donald Trump’s rise to the presidency yesterday. Nearly 80 people gathered in the Vet’s Club in Eugene, to watch FOX News' coverage of Election Night.

As of last night, the contest for House District 14 was still up in the air.  Democrat Julie Fahey held a narrow lead over Republican Kathy Lamberg, who was among those at the watch party. 

Tiffany Eckert

“Too close to call”: that was a phrase heard throughout the night at the Democratic watch party in downtown Eugene.

In their run off race, Joshua Skov and Emily Semple, both Democrats, ran neck and neck for Ward 1 Eugene City Council seat. Skov says the closeness of the race reflects how similar they are as candidates.

Skov: “I’m really hoping that Eugene can be much more of a model of unity. You know, we wanna fight for our candidate, fight for our agenda but we really need to remember that we are, at the end of the day, neighbors.”

Melanie Hyers

Congressman Peter DeFazio took to the stage at the Lane County Democratic watch party last night to assure the crowd that regardless of the outcome of the presidential election, the Democratic Party will not let them down.

Angela Kellner/KLCC

With Oregon ballot Measure 98 passing by a wide margin, supporters in Eugene celebrated Tuesday night.

Brian Bull

The Secretary of State says, as of Monday, more than half of Oregonians who are eligible to vote in the Tuesday election have cast their ballots.

Flickr.com's Firdaus Latif

Tuesday is Election Day, when many Americans will cast their vote and watch the returns. A national initiative called Electionland will be underway, watching the voters.   KLCC's Brian Bull talked with one of the project coordinators, University of Oregon journalism professor Damian Radcliffe. 

Brian Bull

Tomorrow, all the candidates’ speeches, debates, ads, and spending are put to the test.  But while the campaigns themselves are wrapped up, a major Election Day project will be shifting into high gear.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on “Electionland”.  

A bit of covert political sleight of hand has made a pair of legislative races in south central Oregon the focus of attention this election season. JPR’s Liam Moriarty sorts out who’s who in the oddest of this year’s legislative races.

Schools are on the Oregon ballot in a big way this year.

The corporate tax initiative, Measure 97, would raise billions — much of it for schools. Scan down a little further and Measure 98 would direct state funding to high school programs for dropout prevention, college readiness and career training. It would not raise taxes, but it is raising concerns among some educators.

Gov. Kate Brown recently visited Portland’s Madison High School to see how career education helps students graduate.

Jacob Lewin

In recent years, the University of Oregon and Oregon State University together have increased enrollment by more than 10-thousand undergraduates. The number of in-state students has been relatively flat. The new dependence on out-of-state students raises a lot of questions.  Meanwhile the corporate tax measure 97, on the ballot next week, may also have an impact on that trend.

Jon Rosman / OPB

When Oregonians vote in the November election, they’re likely to find a marijuana-related measure. Many cities and counties are asking voters if they want to add a 3 percent local tax to the state tax on recreational marijuana sales. Others, including Douglas County, currently prohibit marijuana sales. They’re asking voters if they want to allow pot dispensaries.

Rachael McDonald

With less than a week to go before Election Day, Lane County Clerk Cheryl Betschart recommends (as of Thursday) voters hand-deliver their ballots to official drop sites instead of putting them in the mail.

Rachael McDonald

Springfield voters are considering a 3-cent gas tax in the November election. The funds will be used to repair the city’s streets.

Kyra Buckley/KLCC

Creswell voters have some important decisions to make concerning public safety and marijuana. If passed, a property tax levy would provide 24-hour police services, something the city currently lacks. Voters will also have the option of reversing the City-imposed ban on marijuana businesses. KLCC’s Kyra Buckley dropped in to learn about those ballot measures and more.

When Kate Brown attended her first Labor Day picnic after becoming governor last year, she spoke for only a few minutes. But union officials who sponsored the event at Oaks Amusement Park in Portland said the governor spent nearly an hour cheerfully shaking the hands of dozens of members waiting in line to get food.

That, said Joe Baessler of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, was more important than anything the governor said from the stage.

Brian Bull

Oregon is one of only three states that vote by mail.  Now one of its senators wants to make that a national practice.  KLCC’s Brian Bull has more: 

Brian Bull

South Eugene high school held its mock election today.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, it lets students cast ballots similar to the general election.  

Brian Bull, National Archives, COP Paris

Election Day gripes have included, “I’m voting for the lesser of two evils” or “I’m only voting for this candidate to keep the other out of office.”  But as KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, a local ballot measure aims to fix this.  

Rachael McDonald

Recorded on: October 21, 2016

Air Date: October 24, 2016

Eugene City Council Ward One race is the only contested race for Eugene’s eight-person City Council in the 2016 General Election.

The race for the Third Senate District in southern Oregon was triggered by the sudden death in August of Dr. Alan Bates. Bates, a Democrat, was widely respected, especially for his work on health care issues.

Now, Democrat Tonia Moro – an attorney -- and Republican Alan DeBoer -- an auto-dealer -- are each making the case that they are the best choice to succeed Bates in a race that has implications for the balance of power in Salem.

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